Vocabulario en inglés: Beat vs Win

Vocabulario en inglés: Beat vs Win

Vocabulario en inglés: Beat vs Win. Congratulations Spain on winning your fourth EuroBasket title!!! It was an exciting match and has inspired me to talk to you about these two words that can be very confusing.

Vocabulario Inglés: Beat

  • Beat means to defeat someone
  • We must say who we have beaten
    • Spain beat France in the basketball championship.
    • Slovenia didn’t beat Poland in the quarter finals.
    • She beats me every time we play chess.
    • Have you ever beaten the computer at this game?

Vocabulario Inglés: win

Win as a verb

  • to have the most amount of points.
  • We do NOT follow win with someone.
    • Spain won the EuroBasket title.
    • Germany didn’t win the the semi-finals, but they won third place.
    • Who won the game last night?
    • She’s an excellent tennis player. She always wins!
  • To earn a prize
    • He won the lottery!
    • What prize did you win?
    • I didn’t win anything – I just got all the right answers.

Win as a noun

  • an event where someone wins something
    • Spain beat France for the Eurobasket win.
    • They’ve had only four wins since the beginning of the season.
    • How many wins have they had so far this year?
    • They haven’t had any wins yet.

Vocabulario Inglés con Vocab Rehab

Now that you have learned about Vocabulario en inglés: Beat vs Win, have a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: icon
Vocab Rehab: procrastinate

Cursos de Inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Álava, tenemos cursos de todos los niveles y para todas las necesidades. Ponte en contacto con nosotros.

Have a crack at something

Have a crack at something

Have a crack at something. This is a way of showing your enthusiasm to try to do something but making it clear that you don’t think you will be successfull.

HAVE A CRACK AT SOMETHING

  • an attempt to do something
  • usaully meaning that you don’t think you will be successful
  • can be used with ‘crack’, ‘go’, ‘stab’ or ‘whack’
  • can also be used with take
    • I’ve never ice skated before, but I took a crack at it this weekend and I rather enjoyed it.
    • Dad would like to have a go at it if you don’t mind.
    • Look, I know this isn’t your job, but would you mind taking a stab at it?
    • Can you have a whack at the new TV, please? I can’t figure anything out.

Expression Session

Now that you had a look at Have a crack at something, have a go at our other expression session posts:
Expression Session: be worth it
Expression Session: drop the ball

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava, tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades para mayores de 16 años. Apúntate a un curso de inglés aquí o ponte en contacto con nosotros a idiomas@camaradealava.com

Word Formations: loss, loser, lost, lose

Word Formations: loss, loser, lost, lose

Word formations: loss, loser, lost, lose. Why are word formations so important for Language learning? Well, from just one word, you can learn to create 5 more! Think about how your vocabulary base grows just by learning how to build word formations.

LOSS (noun)

Word Formations: loss
  • to have less than you previously had of something
    • Weight loss is a multi-billion dollar business.
  • a disadvantage due to have someone leave or due to something being taken
    • If you want to leave that’s fine. It’s your loss.
  • a death
    • the family is grieving from a recent loss.

LOSER (noun)

  • a person or a team that does not win
    • The loser has to buy the first round of drinks.
  • someone that never succeeds.
  • this is a very negative word to use and not appropriate in most cases.
    • I don’t know why she always dates losers.
loser

LOST (adjective)

lost
  • to now know where you are.
    • Hi, I’m calling to say that I will be a bit late to the interview. I am lost.
  • when no one knows where something is.
    • If you don’t try to talk to them, your money will be forever lost.
  • when you don’t know what to do.
    • If you have advice, I would be happy to here it. I feel pretty lost about what I should be doing.

LOSE (verb)

  • Present simple: lose
  • Past simple: lost
  • Past participle: lost
  • to become unable to find something.
    • Do you know where you lost your earrings? We can go back and look.
  • to have something taken away from you, including people by means of death
    • 50 people lost their jobs last month.
    • We lost our brother to Cancer 5 years ago.
  • to have less of something than you had before
    • She has lost the desire to go to trial.
  • The opposite of win
    • I can’t believe Madrid lost!
lose

LOST (verb) vs LOST (adjective)

lost vs lost

This can get a bit complicated. Note that the past tense of ‘lose’ is ‘lost’ and ‘lost can also be an adjective.

  • Verbs describe the action
    • I lost ·$5.00.
  • Adjectives describe a noun or pronoun.
    • I found the lost money.

Vocab Rehab

Now that you have seen Word Formations: loss, loser, lost, lose, take a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: oversight
Vocab Rehab: discrepancy

Cursos de inglés

Tenemos cursos de inglés para mayores de 16 años, para todos los niveles y necesidades en la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Álava.

English Grammar: seem

English Grammar: seem

English Grammar: seem. Seem is a word that is very useful, especially when using polite language. But, are you using it correctly?

USE

  • use the word ‘seem’ to say that something appears to be a certain way.
  • Also use it in polite language to presetn your idea about something.
  • NOTE: do not use seem as a continuous verb. It is a stative verb.

FORM

There are two ways to use the word ‘seem’.

  • with an infinitive or
  • as a linking verb

SEEM WITH INFINTIVE

  • Subject + seem + infintive
    • She seems to always show up 20 minutes late.
    • He seemed to know the answer.
  • Subject + seem + to be + noun
    • She seems to always be 20 minutes late
    • There seems to be a mistake.

SEEM AS A LINKING VERB

Linking verbs are verbs that are used to describe the subject. Common examples are ‘seem’ and ‘be’.

  • Subject + seem + adjective/noun
    • It seems strange that she didn’t come to the party.
    • It seems a waste of time to drive in such a small city.

SEEM AS A LINKING VERB WITH A CLAUSE

Remember, that clauses include a subject and a verb, so after that, as if, as though and like, we need to use a subject and a verb.

  • It + seems + that
    • It seems that they won.
  • It + seems + as if
    • It seems as if he knew they were going to win.
  • It + seems + as though
    • It seemed as though she was upset about something.
  • It + seems + like
    • It seems like everyone is going.

Grammar

Now that you have seen: English Grammar: seem, take a look at our other Grammar posts:
Grammar: Stative verbs
Grammar: Present Continuous

Cursos Inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava, tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los necesidades y niveles.

Stative Verbs in English

Stative Verbs in English

Stative Verbs in English

Stative Verbs in English. Stative verbs (or State verbs) refer to verbs that describe a state, not an action. These are verbs that we rarely use in the Present Continuous form since they do not show actions. Having said that, this is changing, as languages often do. Below you can learn about how to use Stative Verbs and how to use some verbs as Stative and Dynamic (verbs that show action).

STATIVE VERBS

Remember that a Stative verb means that there is not an action happening. It is only a ‘state’.

Examples

  • In the context of the examples to the right, we would not be able to use the Present Continuous because the verbs represent a state, not an action.

List of Stative verbs

There are 4 general categories of Stative Verbs but remember that some of these verbs can be used in both Stative and Dynamic form. What makes them stative is that they are explaining a state, not an action.

EMOTIONS AND
FEELINGS
PERSEPTIONS
AND SENSES
OPINION POSSESION
AND SIZE
like,
dislike
love
need
prefer
want
wish
appear
feel
hear
look
see
seem
sound
smell
taste
agree
disagree
believe
know
imagine
think
understand
be
belong
have
own
posses
measure
weigh

VERBS THAT ARE STATIVE AND DYNAMIC

So, now we know that Stative verbs only show a ‘state’, so Dynamic verbs show ‘action’. Some examples of Dynamic verbs are: run, dance, shower, play, etc. We can see the action occuring. Some verbs can be used both as a state and as an action. Here are some examples.

Examples

  • Think as a stative mental state
    • I think she is right.
    • He thinks the meeting is on Monday. I think it’s on Tuesday.
  • Think as an action in progress with Present Continuous
    • Please turn down the music. I’m thinking.
    • He’s thinking of having the meeting on Monday.
  • to be as a state of someone’s personality
    • Jim is such a nice guy
    • She’s always fair.
  • to be as a temporary action that is happening right now
    • He‘s not being very friendly at all today.
    • I don’t think she’s being very fair to you.
  • to have as a state of posession
    • We have a house in Malaga
    • She has a lot of friends.
  • to have as an activity that is taking place now or soon.
    • I’m having a party this weekend.
    • She’s having some friends over tonight to watch a movie.

OTHER VERBS THAT CAN BE BOTH STATIVE AND DYNAMIC

  • Remember that when you want to use a verb in a Stative form it is a ‘state’
    • The dinner tastes great!
  • But when it is in a dynamic state, there is action.
    • We are tasting each wine.

Cursos Inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio, tenemos cursos de inglés para todas las necesidades y niveles. Pónte en contacto con nosotros a idiomas@camaradealava.com

Grammar

Now that you have read about Stative Verbs in English, take a look at our other Grammar posts:
Grammar: Present Continous
Grammar: Second Conditional

English Grammar: Present Continuous

English Grammar: Present Continuous

English Grammar: Present Continuous. Both Spanish and English have a Present Continuous verb tense (I’m working / Estoy trabajando) and although their form is similar (verb to be + gerund), they are used differently. In English, we use the Present Continuous for: (1) things happening in the moment, (2) ongoing actions that are happening around the current time (3) annoying habits and (4) future plans.

FORM

The form of Present Continuous is the same in Spanish and English

  • Positive statements
    • Subject + verb to be + gerund
  • Negative statements
    • Subject + verb to be + not + gerund
  • Questions
    • Verb to be + subject + gerund

USES

THINGS THAT ARE HAPPENING IN THE MOMENT

  • Use present continuous to talk about something you are doing at the moment that you are saying it.
    • I’m writing this blog post right now.
    • I’m looking out the window.
  • NOTE: in Spanish you say ‘te escribo‘ in an email, but in English we say ‘I’m writing…‘ because for us it is something we are doing in that very moment. Learn more here.

ONGOING EVENTS / TEMPORARY SITUATIONS/HABITS

  • Present Continuous is also used for ongoing events or temporary situations. I may not be doing them at this very moment, but at this time in my life.
    • I’m learning to paint. (not right now, but I go to a class twice a week)
    • She’s not going to class this month. (She’ll go again next month)

ANNOYING HABITS

  • Use Present Continuous to show you are annoyed with someone’s habit.
    • You are always watching the TV!
    • He’s always complaining.

DEFINITE FUTURE PLANS

  • For definite future plans, we also use present continuous
    • After work I’m going to the gym.
    • Next month we are going to Malaga

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SPANISH AND ENGLISH

  • There are times when in English we use present continuous but in Spanish you use Present Simple.
  • In addition to the examples in the photo on the right, we have the following:
    • What time are you going? ¿A que hora vas?
    • Who are you going with? ¿Con quien vas?
    • I’m attaching the document you requested. Adjunto el documento que me hayas pedido.

English Grammar

Now that you have seen English Grammar: Present Continuous, take a look at our other English Grammar posts:
English Grammar: Second Conditional
English Grammar: Regret + gerund/infinitive

English Vocabulary: tenacious

English Vocabulary: tenacious

English Vocabulary: tenacious. There are lots of names for these kinds of people: persistent, tough, annoying. But, when we use the word tenacious, there is a strength behind it. We are talking about someone who won’t stop usually because they believe strongly in something.

TENACIOUS

  • Adjective
  • Someone who doesn’t stop until they achieve what they want.
    • Amnesty International is a tenacious advocate for human rights.
    • She’s a tenacious little girl and doesn’t accept no for an answer.
  • Something that is strong or not persistent.
    • We need to find a more tenacious metal for this project.
    • Julie really has a tenacious memory

TENACITY

  • noun
  • the quality of being very determned.
    • I admire your tenacity for change.
    • He showed a lot of tenacity, but in the end I’m not sure he is going to win.
  • The quality of persisting
    • The company has outlived the other ones out of sheer tenacity.
    • The tenacity of certain stories allow then to be told by each generation.

TANACIOUSLY

  • adverb
  • To achieve something in a tenacious way.
    • Joe is tenaciously battling the lawsuit in court.
    • We tenaciously record every event so that future generations will know what happened.

Cursos de inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades, presencialmente y online.

English Vocabulary

Now that you have read about English Vocabulary: tenacious, take a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: time off
Vocab Rehab: strive

C1 Advanced Writing

C1 Advanced Writing

C1 Advanced Writing

C1 Advanced Writing. In part 2 of the CAE C1 Advanced Cambridge exam, you have the option of choing between writing a report, a letter or email, a review or a proposal. It can be confusing, knowing what to put and where. Here I have reduced the information into categories to help you remember.

REPORT

  • In reports, remember to add:
    • a title and sub-headings for each paragraph
    • formal or neutral style as reports tend to be for work
    • a beginning that clearly states the reason for writing the report.
    • Finish off the report with a conclusion or a recommendation that specifically addresses the reson for writing the report.

PROPOSALS

  • In reports, be sure to include:
    • a title and subheadings for each paragraph
    • a formal or neutral style
    • a clear argument that has reasons and examples backing it up. Remember RED.
    • persuasive language which is key to writing the proposal.
C1 Writing Proposals

LETTERS OR EMAILS

  • for letter and emails, be sure to include:
    • the receiver’s name in the correct style (use Mr, Ms, Miss or Mrs + full name for formal letters. Use person’s first name for informal ones.
    • a formal, neutral or informal style depending on who you are writing to.
    • correct openings and closings (Dear, Good Morning, Sincerely, Thanks, etc)

REVIEWS

  • For reviews, remember to add:
    • an interesting title
    • formal or neutral style
    • an interesting fact, a question or an antecdote to begin the review in order to capture the reader’s attention
    • your opinion and back it up with clear examples.
    • some factual informal
    • persuasive language if want the reader to do read, listen, shop, etc to what you are writing about.
C1 Writing Reviews

WRITING TIPS

I can’t stress enough how important it is to go back and re-read your writing. The most common errors to check for are:

  • Subject-verb agreement (singular or plural)
  • articles (a, the, some)
  • prepositions 
  • use of correct tenses
  • word order 
  • spelling mistakes
  • over-all flow and organization of your writing.

WRITING RULES

Now that you have read C1 Advanced Writing, take a look at our other Writing Rules posts:
Writing Rules: Formal and Informal
Writing Rules: Giving Advice

English: Regret + gerund or infinitive

English: Regret + gerund or infinitive

English: Regret + gerund or infinitive

English: Regret + gerund or infinitive. Again we are reviewing a word whose meaning changes depending on the use of the gerund or infinitve following it. Since regret is a word were we are already sorry about something, we don’t want to use it incorrectly.

REGRET + GERUND

  • Use regret + gerund to express that you are sorry about something you have said or done.
    • He really regrets not calling you. (He wishes he had called)
    • My daughter regrets telling her best friend her secret. (She wishes she didn’t tell her)

REGRET + INFINITIVE

  • Use regret + infinitive (without to) before giving someone bad news.
    • I regret to tell you that your sister didn’t make it out of surgery. (I’m sorry, but…)
    • We regret to inform you that your payment has not been accepted. (We have bad news…)

Practice

Now that you have read through the explanations, try answering the following sentences with the correct form of the verb. Check your answers at the bottom of the post

  1. We really reget ____ (tell) her that she was sick. I think she would have been better off not knowing.
  2. They regret ____ (lie) about the case because now they can be sued, not because they feel sorry.
  3. I regret ____ (inform) you that your payment is overdue.
  4. The letter stated, ‘We regret ____ (tell) you that you have not been accepted.’
  5. I don’t regret ____ (tell) her the truth. She deserved to know.
  6. Why do you regret ____ (move) here?
  7. On behalf of the airline, I regret ____ (inform) you that this flight is overbooked.
  8. She told me that she regrets ____ (be) my friend.
  9. I don’t regret ____ (inform) them about what happened on the trip.
  10. Do you regret ____ (go) on vacation?

Grammar

Now that you have seen English: Regret + gerund or infinitive, have a look at our other Grammar based posts:
Grammar: remember + gerund or infinitive
Grammar: transitive and intransitive verbs in less than 5 minutes

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Alava, tenemos cursos de inglés para todas las necesidades y niveles. Ponte en contacto con nosotros para recibir más información.

Answers

  1. telling
  2. lying
  3. to inform
  4. to tell
  5. telling
  6. moving
  7. to inform
  8. being
  9. informing
  10. going
Giving advice in English

Giving advice in English

Giving advice in English

Giving advice in English. There are only a few occasions when you should be using ‘have to’ with someone.

  1. You are a parent and you are telling your children what to do (and this concept is debatable)
    • You have to clean your room before you leave this house.
  2. You are telling your friend in an exaggerated way what they need to do because it was fun, exciting, entertaining, etc.
    • You HAVE TO see the last season of Stranger Things!
  3. You are seriously concerned about someone.
    • We have to go to the emergency room now!

If you are not in one of these three situations, then stop telling people in English what they ‘have to do’. This is a strong statement for us and is usually used for children. So, when speaking or writing to adults, employees, etc, I soften my advice by using some of the following phrases. Why? Because they are adults and can make the best decisions for themselves. And yes! This included employees.

I RECOMMEND / SUGGEST…

  • A polite way of giving advice to someone
  • 1 Form: Person + recommend/suggest + gerund
    • They recommend printing the file instead of sending it by email.
    • She suggests charging them before sending anything out.
  • 2 Form: Person + recommend/suggest + noun
    • My doctor doesn’t recommend those pills for pain.
    • Lucia suggests the white one because it is lighter.

I WOULD RECOMMEND / SUGGEST…

  • A more polite way to give advice.
  • 1. Form: Person + would recommend/suggest + gerund
    • I would suggest calling the store first to see if it’s still open before you take a ride over there.
    • I wouldn’t recommend eating there. It hasn’t got very good reviews.
  • 2. Form: Person + would recommend/suggest + noun
    • I wouldn’t recommend the beef to anyone. It was not their best dish.
    • I think a doctor would suggest time off for that type of injury.
  • Use the adverbs highly or stongly to give strength to your statement.
    • I would highly recommend checking with your doctor before trying that medication.
    • She would strongly recommend Paul’s garage for any problems you may have with your car.

IF I WERE YOU…

  • A way of giving advice based on what you would do if you were in their situation.
  • Form: If I were you + I + would + infintive (without to)
    • If I were you, I would finish send the email out before the end of the day.
    • If I were you, I would talk to my boss before jumpling to any conclusions.

HAVE YOU TRIED…

  • An inoffensive way of asking what someone has already done.
  • Form: Have you tried + gerund
    • Have you tried turning it on and off again?
    • Have you tried calling their main line and asking to speak to him directly?

Writing rules

Now that you have seen Giving advice in English, take a look at out other Writing Rules posts.
Writing Rules: I’m writing
Writing Rules: Gerunds that follow to

Cursos inglés

¡Ven a la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Alava para apuntarse a un curso de inglés hoy mismo!

Curso de Inglés Gratuito

Curso de Inglés Gratuito

Curso de Inglés Gratuito. En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Álava, anualmente ofrecemos el curso SKILLS FOR INTERNATIONAL SALES que 100% subvencionado. Quiere decir que este curso de 40 horas te va a salir gratis. Inscribirte aquí

Información sobre el curso de inglés gratuito

  • FECHA: 12 a 21 de septiembre de 2023
  • HORARIO: 09:00 a 14:00, lunes a jueves
  • TOTAL DE HORAS: 40 horas
  • DONDE: en la Escuela de Formación de la Cámara de Comercio de Álava en Vitoria-Gasteiz. Pincha aquí para ver donde estamos
  • PARA QUIEN: damos prioridad a gente desempleado pero todos/as mayores de 16 que tengan un nivel B2 (certificado no es necesario) están bienvenidos/as
  • QUIEN: Las profesoras y los profesores cualificadas/os y con experiencia
  • COMO: inscríbete aquí

¿Qué aprendo en este curso de inglés?

Cada día es más importante hablar en público. No solo en conferencias, pero enfrente de tu jefe durante una reunión o vendiendo tu producto a otra empresa. Así que el primer módulo de este curso esta diseñado a ayudarte en estos momentos.

Módulo 1

  • Provide the necessary tools to inform, inspire and entertain your audience.
  • How to engage your audience from the very beginning.
  • Pay attention to body language
  • How to use vidual aids effectively
  • How to guide your audience throughout your speech
  • How to deal with questions from the audience

Módulo 2

  • Define the stages and elements of the negotiation process
  • Develop the skills and techniques of a successful negotiator
  • Identify optimal win-win solutions in negotiations and make profitable deals
  • Differentiate negotation styles and mental models, analyze their own and their partner’s behaviour in negotiations.
  • Learn about cross-cultural differences in negotiations
  • Communicate through emails, chats, video-conferences and telephone

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava tenemos cursos para todos los niveles y necesidades. También ofrecemos el Oxford Test of English ya que somos un centro examinador. Aprender más sobre el Oxford Test of English para certificar tu nivel de A2, B1 y B2 aquí.

English Vocabulary: to be promoted

English Vocabulary: to be promoted

English Vocabulary: to be promoted. Today we celebrate the fact that our local football club, Alaves has been promoted to First Division! ¡Aupa Alaves! Click here to read more about Vitoria-Gasteiz’s Alaves team, but before you do that, let’s take a look at the different meanings of promote. Also, check out the collocations used with promote.

TO BE PROMOTED

  • to raise someone to a more important position
  • Usually someone is promoted to something
    • John has just been promoted to the head of his department, so we are having a party for him.
    • If the team wins the next game, then they will be promoted to 2nd Division.

TO PROMOTE

  • to encourage people to like and/or buy a product
    • Kristen is promoting a new line of cosmetics, so you should buy from her.
    • If you really want to promote your product well, you should talk to an advertising company.
  • To encourage people to like and support an idea.
    • The world leaders really need to promote the idea of taking care of the planet or else there will never be real change.
    • They promote peace talks between the two countries.

COLLOCATIONS WITH PROMOTE

  • adverbs that collocate with promote
    • actively, positively, widely
      • We are actively promoting English classes, so sign up today.
    • aggressively, heavily,
      • I’m not sure I agree with such aggressive promoting, but I see that it is effective.
    • effectively, successfully
      • The company is successfully promoting the product nationally and plans to go international.
  • nouns that collocate with promote
    • access, diversity, equality, human rights, awareness
      • I do all I can to promote diversity and inclusion at work and at home.
    • efficiency, innovation, education,
      • If the government really wants to promote innovation, they need to provide more grant money to start up businesses.
    • business, growth, development
      • The new mayor says she want to promote growth, so she is presenting a new bill.
    • competition, debate, dialogue, trade
      • If we don’t promote dialogue and debate, then we will never grow as a country.

English Vocabulary

Now that you saw ‘English Vocabulary: to be promoted‘, take a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: hear vs listen
Vocab Rehab: raise, rise, arise

Cursos de inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Álava, tenemos cursos para todos los niveles y necesidades. Contáctanos a idiomas@camaradealava.com. Tenemos cursos online y presencial para mayores de 16 años.

English Vocabulary: hear vs Listen

English Vocabulary: hear vs listen

English Vocabulary: hear vs listen. These two verbs get mixed up all the time. So, let’s look at how they are different and how they are similar.

HEAR

  • Irregular, Transitive and Intransitive verb
  • Think of ‘hear’ as an event.
    • I heard what the Prime Minister said yesterday. The focus is on the event of the Prime Minister, not that I heard it.
  • You receive a sound / you are conscious of a sound
    • Did you hear that? I think someone is at the door.
  • You understand a piece of information
    • He heard they are getting a divorce.

LISTEN

  • Regular, transitive verb
  • Usually followed by ‘to’
  • Think of listen to as an action.
  • He never listens to me when I’m speaking. It’s so annoying. (The focus is on the action of listening.)
  • To give your attention to someone or something.
    • I listened to the whole album and I love it.

HEAR OR LISTEN

Sometimes we can use both hear or listen in a sentence. However, the meaning changes a bit.

  • Remember, we use ‘hear’ to focus on the activity and ‘listen’ to focus on the action.
    • I love hearing the rain hitting the window. (the focus is on the rain hitting the window)
    • I love listening to the rain hitting the window. (the focus is on listening)

English Vocabulary

Now that you have read about English Vocabulary: hear vs listen, take a look at our other vocabulary based posts:
Vocab Rehab: Raise, Rise, Arise
Vocab Rehab: Backlash

Cursos de inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Álava, tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades.

Would you mind?

Would you mind?

Would you mind? Although this seems like a very simple phrase, it can get quite confusing. M1nd in this question means ‘to bother’ or ‘molestar‘ in Spanish. The tricky part is in the answer. No, it doesn’t bother me or yes, it does bother me.

ASKING FOR PERMISSION

This is an indirect way of asking for permission for something. It is quite commonly used in English. Pay special attention to the answers.

DO YOU MIND?

Informal question

Do/Does (someone) mind + if + subject + present simple

  • Informal way to ask if something bothers you or makes you uncomfortable.
    • Do you mind if I call you Joe? (Does it bother you if I call you Joe?
    • No, I don’t. (You can call me Joe)
    • Yes, I do. (I don’t want you to call me Joe.
Do you mind if he comes? ¿Te importa que venga?informal
No, I don’t No, no me importa
Yes, I do Si me importa.

WOULD (someone) MIND?

Would (someone) mind + if + subject + present simple

  • Polite way to ask permission from someone, by asking if it bothers them.
    • Would he mind if I use his phone? (Can I use his phone?)
    • No, he wouldn’t. (You can use it)
    • Yes, he would. (I don’t want you to use it.)
Would you mind?
Would she mind if we met after class? ¿Le importaría si quedamos después de clase?Polite
No, she wouldn’t. No, no le importaría.
Yes, she would. Si, si le importaría.

Would (someone) mind if + past simple

Polite and Formal question

Would someone m1nd + if + subject + past simple

  • Would she m1nd if we didn’t go together (Would it bother her if we went separately?)
  • No, she wouldn’t. (we can go separately)
  • Yes, she would. (I would rather go together)
Would he mind if we arrived late? ¿Le importaría que llegáramos tarde?Polite and Formal
No, he wouldn’t No, no le importaría.
Yes, he would. Si le importaría.

Would (someone) mind + me/my + ing… ?

  • Would they mind me leaving early? (Will it bother them if I leave perfore expected?)
  • No, they wouldn’t (It is OK if you leave early)
  • Yes, they would. (I will not be happy if you leave early)
Polite and formal

REQUESTING HELP

We can also use this question form to politely request help from someone.

WOULD (someone) M1ND + ING

Polite

Would (someone) mind + ing…?

  • Would Carol mind picking up my daughter from school? (Can Carol and/or does Carol want to get my daughter from school?)
  • No, she wouldn’t (I can get her)
  • Yes, she would. (I can’t or do not want to get her)

ANSWERING NO OR YES

As you have seen in the previous examples, you can answer these types of questions with ‘Yes, I do/would’ or ‘No, I don’t/wouldn’t’. However, it quite common to use some of the following phrases as well.

NO

  • Of course not
  • Not a problem
  • No, I can do it.
  • Sorry, but I can’t
  • I would, but I …
  • It’s not that I m1nd, I just can’t.

English Grammar

Take a look at our other Grammar posts:
Grammar: Multi- Word Verbs
Grammar: Reflexive Pronouns

Cursos de inglés

En la Cámara de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio, tenemos clases para todos los niveles y necesidades. Ponte en contacto con nosotras a idiomas@camaradealava.com o ver nuestros cursos pinchando aquí

Online Business English Course

Online Business English Course

Online Business English Course. Now you can receive English Classes from home, the office or your hotel. Sometimes it is difficult to fit everything in when you work long hours, but that doesn’t mean you have to let your English go.

What you will learn in an online class

Many students worry that an online class isn’t as dynamic as an in-person class, but that is not the case. We have small groups and tools for having private and group discussions. We are able to do listenings just as if we were together in a room. Material is sent to you before each class for you to print out or use online.

SOME OF THE TOPICS WE EXPLORE ACTIVITIES WE DO
Communication
Corporate Image
Conference calls
Writing emails- language and registrar
Outsourcing
Logistics and Supply Chain
Managing Conflict
Marketing and Sales
Risk Management
Wind, Solar and Hydroelectric Power
Cultural Differences and Global Teams
…and much more
Discussion
Vocabulary
Reading Comprehension
Listening
Short Videos
Case Studies
Grammar
Writing

Types of Classes

We have different types of Online Business English Courses.

  • Group
    • 3 hours a week, 2 days a week
    • this class has students from various backgrounds and businesses
    • Some topics are more general for everyone and some are specific to the field of work of the members of the group.
  • Private class
    • 1 to 3 hours a week.
    • One-to-one class with a teacher
    • Topics related to general Business English practice, focusing on fluency and communication
  • InCompany class
    • 1 to 3 hours a week
    • One-to-one o groups
    • Specialized Business English Classes tailored to a company’s specific needs
      • examples: presentations, finance, law, video conferences, emails, etc.

Cámara de Comercio de Álava

The Alava Chamber of Commerce (Cámara de Comercio de Álava) has more than 30 years experience working with business in and around Alava, Spain. Now you can be a part of this learning experience from anywhere in the world. To find out more information, click here or write us at idiomas@camaradealava

B2 C1 C2 English Vocabulary: Grateful

B2 C1 C2 English Vocabulary: Grateful

B2 C1 C2 English Vocabulary: Grateful

B2 C1 C2 English Vocabulary: Grateful. Every fourth Thursday of November, people in the US celebrate Thanksgiving. From all the TV shows and movies, you would think that this is the most important holiday in the US, but that is not the case. People travel so much for Thanksgiving because it is a four day weekend: one of the only ones we get in a year. So, everyone takes advantage of that. Thanksgiving is widely criticized for its origin, but for me, it’s just a day to really be thankful and grateful for what I have.

Grateful

  • Showing and expressing thanks
    • I’d be grateful if you would send me the information today.
    • I’m grateful for my health and happiness.
    • She was a bit annoyed with John, since he didn’t seem very grateful for all her hard work.
    • Working for someone who is grateful for the extra hours I put in makes all the difference to me.

Vocab Rehab

Now that you have learned about B2 C1 C2 English Vocabulary: Grateful, take a look at our other vocabulary-based posts:
Vocab Rehab: False Friends: Terrific and terrifying
Vocab Rehab: Irregular plurals

Follow us

To receive our posts once a month, subscribe to our blog.
If you would like to see our posts on a weekly basis, click here to follow us your favorite social media platform.