English Expression: Level the playing field

English Expression: Level the playing field

English Expression: Level the playing field. This week in class we are talking about inclusive language. This is hard to do with idioms, as they are notoriously not inclusive. In the example given today, someone may say that it is NOT inclusive because it uses sports and so you may need to understand baseball, in this case, to understand the meaning. However, I am using it today because I think it has an important message.

LEVEL THE PLAYING FIELD

  • Make a situation equal so that everyone has the same opportunity
  • Adjust a situation so that everyone has the same chance of succeeding.
    • Quotas were created at businesses to level the playing field for women.
    • In order to level the playing field, we need to make the class financially accessible to everyone.

A LEVEL PLAYING FIELD

  • Conditions that allow everyone to have the same opportunity to succeed in a situation.
    • It’s not a level playing field. How can children play in the same tournament as adults?
    • We have put quotas in place in order to create a level playing field.

English Expressions

Now that you have seen English Expression: Level the playing field, take a look at our other Expression Session posts:
Expression Session: turn over a new leaf
Expression Session: have skeletons in one’s closet

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Alava, tenemos cursos para todos los niveles y necesidades para mayores de 16 años.

English: Inclusive language

English: Inclusive language

English: Inclusive language

English: Inclusive language. As society evolves, so does language. It’s important to make sure that you are using language that is inclusive and does not discriminate against individuals in and out of the office.

INCLUSIVE LANGUAGE

  • language that does not discriminate
  • language that represents different people in a positive way

GENDER INCLUSIVE LANGUAGE

  • to refer to the male and female workers in your business, use workforce, personnel or staff.
    • There are 200 men and women that make up our worforce.
  • manpower is a sexist word that refers to a time when women did not work. It also sounds as if men are powerful and women are not.
  • Other examples of gender inclusive language includes saying ‘Hello everyone’ instead of ‘Hello guys’ to refer to women and men.
  • please stop calling women over the age of 18, girls. They are women. Calling them a girl sounds as though they are innocent or incapable.
    • Women make up 50% of the Board of Directors.
  • Refering to men and women as female or male staff members/members of staff is also an acceptable,
    • The male members of staff are requesting a new changing room.

Inclusive language for people with disabilities

  • Disabled member of staff or a person with disabilities, although is not a great alternative, it is what we have as of November 2023.
    • If we want to invite Arantxa for lunch, we need to make sure that our house is accessible for someone with a disability.
  • Handicapped and differently-abled were both terms that were used at one point and are no longer seen as positive.
  • Know someone who has a disability? Ask them how they prefered to be called.

Age inclusive language

  • nobody wants to be called old, so stop using this word and use elderly to talk about people over the age of 70.
    • The elderly are often excluded from society.
  • For those staff members who are up in age, try experienced worker, senior worker or senior member of staff.
    • Our senior workers are our most valuable members of staff.

Inclusive language about one’s sexual orientation

  • Don’t asume that the person in front of you is married and that they are to a man or a woman. Instead of asking about their husband or wife, ask about their partner.
  • Don’t asume a man dates a woman and vice versa, ask if they are dating anyone.
  • There exist lots of different ways in which LGBTQ+ liked to be addressed. If you aren’t sure how to address someone, ask them.
  • Again, if you aren’t sure how to address people at work, at a bar or at the dinner table, ask them.

Vocabulary in English

Now that you have seen English: Inclusive language, have a look at our other Vocab Rehab Posts.

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de idiomas de la Camara de Comercio tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades.

English Expression: turn over a new leaf

English Expression: turn over a new leaf

English Expression: turn over a new leaf. This seems like the perfect idiom for this time of year when the leaves on the trees are falling. Turning over a new leaf means starting fresh and changing your behavior.

TURNING OVER A NEW LEAF

  • to say that someone is beginning to behave in a better, kinder way.
  • to behave in a positive way
    • I’m so glad that you spoke to Sarah. She’s really turned over a new leaf and even seems happier in her job.
    • You can’t expect him to just turn over a new leaf if he doesn’t even know that he is behaving poorly. Talk to him.

Expression Session

Now that you have seen English Expression: turn over a new leaf, take a look at our other Expression Session posts:
Expression Session: have skeletons in one’s closet
Expression Session: bear in mind

Cursos de inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava, tenemos cursos para todos los niveles y necesidades. Para poder inscribirte en un curso o para recibir información, pinche aquí.

  • Cursos para principiantes, nivel A1 y A2, inglés general y de negocios
  • Cursos de preparación de exámenes de niveles A2, B1, B2, C1 y C2
  • Inglés para negocios (grupales, individuales, presencial y online)
  • Conversación, nivel B2, C1, C2
English: Regret + gerund or infinitive

English: Regret + gerund or infinitive

English: Regret + gerund or infinitive

English: Regret + gerund or infinitive. Again we are reviewing a word whose meaning changes depending on the use of the gerund or infinitve following it. Since regret is a word were we are already sorry about something, we don’t want to use it incorrectly.

REGRET + GERUND

  • Use regret + gerund to express that you are sorry about something you have said or done.
    • He really regrets not calling you. (He wishes he had called)
    • My daughter regrets telling her best friend her secret. (She wishes she didn’t tell her)

REGRET + INFINITIVE

  • Use regret + infinitive (without to) before giving someone bad news.
    • I regret to tell you that your sister didn’t make it out of surgery. (I’m sorry, but…)
    • We regret to inform you that your payment has not been accepted. (We have bad news…)

Practice

Now that you have read through the explanations, try answering the following sentences with the correct form of the verb. Check your answers at the bottom of the post

  1. We really reget ____ (tell) her that she was sick. I think she would have been better off not knowing.
  2. They regret ____ (lie) about the case because now they can be sued, not because they feel sorry.
  3. I regret ____ (inform) you that your payment is overdue.
  4. The letter stated, ‘We regret ____ (tell) you that you have not been accepted.’
  5. I don’t regret ____ (tell) her the truth. She deserved to know.
  6. Why do you regret ____ (move) here?
  7. On behalf of the airline, I regret ____ (inform) you that this flight is overbooked.
  8. She told me that she regrets ____ (be) my friend.
  9. I don’t regret ____ (inform) them about what happened on the trip.
  10. Do you regret ____ (go) on vacation?

Grammar

Now that you have seen English: Regret + gerund or infinitive, have a look at our other Grammar based posts:
Grammar: remember + gerund or infinitive
Grammar: transitive and intransitive verbs in less than 5 minutes

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Alava, tenemos cursos de inglés para todas las necesidades y niveles. Ponte en contacto con nosotros para recibir más información.

Answers

  1. telling
  2. lying
  3. to inform
  4. to tell
  5. telling
  6. moving
  7. to inform
  8. being
  9. informing
  10. going
Giving advice in English

Giving advice in English

Giving advice in English

Giving advice in English. There are only a few occasions when you should be using ‘have to’ with someone.

  1. You are a parent and you are telling your children what to do (and this concept is debatable)
    • You have to clean your room before you leave this house.
  2. You are telling your friend in an exaggerated way what they need to do because it was fun, exciting, entertaining, etc.
    • You HAVE TO see the last season of Stranger Things!
  3. You are seriously concerned about someone.
    • We have to go to the emergency room now!

If you are not in one of these three situations, then stop telling people in English what they ‘have to do’. This is a strong statement for us and is usually used for children. So, when speaking or writing to adults, employees, etc, I soften my advice by using some of the following phrases. Why? Because they are adults and can make the best decisions for themselves. And yes! This included employees.

I RECOMMEND / SUGGEST…

  • A polite way of giving advice to someone
  • 1 Form: Person + recommend/suggest + gerund
    • They recommend printing the file instead of sending it by email.
    • She suggests charging them before sending anything out.
  • 2 Form: Person + recommend/suggest + noun
    • My doctor doesn’t recommend those pills for pain.
    • Lucia suggests the white one because it is lighter.

I WOULD RECOMMEND / SUGGEST…

  • A more polite way to give advice.
  • 1. Form: Person + would recommend/suggest + gerund
    • I would suggest calling the store first to see if it’s still open before you take a ride over there.
    • I wouldn’t recommend eating there. It hasn’t got very good reviews.
  • 2. Form: Person + would recommend/suggest + noun
    • I wouldn’t recommend the beef to anyone. It was not their best dish.
    • I think a doctor would suggest time off for that type of injury.
  • Use the adverbs highly or stongly to give strength to your statement.
    • I would highly recommend checking with your doctor before trying that medication.
    • She would strongly recommend Paul’s garage for any problems you may have with your car.

IF I WERE YOU…

  • A way of giving advice based on what you would do if you were in their situation.
  • Form: If I were you + I + would + infintive (without to)
    • If I were you, I would finish send the email out before the end of the day.
    • If I were you, I would talk to my boss before jumpling to any conclusions.

HAVE YOU TRIED…

  • An inoffensive way of asking what someone has already done.
  • Form: Have you tried + gerund
    • Have you tried turning it on and off again?
    • Have you tried calling their main line and asking to speak to him directly?

Writing rules

Now that you have seen Giving advice in English, take a look at out other Writing Rules posts.
Writing Rules: I’m writing
Writing Rules: Gerunds that follow to

Cursos inglés

¡Ven a la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Alava para apuntarse a un curso de inglés hoy mismo!

English Expression: Have skeletons in one's closet

English Expression: Have skeletons in one’s closet

English Expression: Have skeletons in one’s closet. It’s Halloween time, so let’s take a look at this very Halloweeny idiom.

HAVE SKELETONS IN ONE’S CLOSET

  • to have a secret about something bad that you have done in the past
    • I’m not sure I trust him. I think he has some skeletons in his closet.
    • We all have skeletons in our closets. I promise I won’t judge you if you tell me them.
  • to have a secret about something embarrassing that happened to you in the past.
    • Don’t bring up all my skeletons in the closet in front of John. It’s too embarrassing.
    • Nobody’s family is perfect. They all have skeletons in the closet.

SKELETONS IN THE CUPBOARD

  • Has the same meaning as skeletons in the closet.
    • I don’t like talking about my skeletons in the cupboard.
    • He never talks about himself. I think he has some skeletons in his cupboard that he doesn’t want to talk about.

Halloween vocabulary

Now that you have seen English Expression: Have skeletons in one’s closet, take a look at our other Halloween-based posts:
How to carve a pumpkin
Vocab Rehab: synonyms for scary
Podcast: off the cuff: Halloween!

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio, tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades. Ponte en contacto con nosotros: idiomas@camaradealava.com

Remember + gerund or infinitive

Remember + gerund or infinitive

Remember + gerund or infinitive

Remember + gerund or infinitive. Remember can be followed by either a geruna or an infinitive, but the meaning changes. It’s important to know the difference

REMEMBER + GERUND

  • Use a gerund after remember to talk about memories or to recall someone or something
    • He remembers wearing a suit but that really all he remembers from that day. (He can recall the memory of wearing the suit).
    • I don’t remember talking to her, but I could be wrong. (Maybe I just forgot that we talked)

REMEMBER + INFINITIVE

  • Use remember + infinitve to express that you have not forgotten to do something
    • I didn’t remember to pay the fee, so we lost the membership. (I forgot to pay the fee).
  • Many times we use remember + infinitive to give a stong suggestion to someone who should not forget to do something.
    • Remember to take an umbrella. It’s going to rain later. (don’t forget your umbrella)

PRACTICE

Fill in the blank with the appropriate form of the verb in parentasis. Then check your answers at the bottom of the post

  1. Did you remember _______ John back about the meeting tomorrow? (call)
  2. I don’t remember ever _______ this city before? (visit)
  3. Doesn’t she remember _______ together as kids when they were younger? (play)
  4. I’m really sorry but I didn’t remember _______ the box from the office. (pick up)
  5. Why doesn’t she ever remember _______ her homework on time? (finish)
  6. Julie doesn’t remember _______ him at the fair. (meet)
  7. Remember _______ your driver’s license this year! (renew)
  8. I remember _______ to the store, but I don’t remember _______ the apples (go, buy)
  9. George, did you remember _______ the paper for the office? (order)
  10. I will always remember _______ it in the future after getting in so much trouble. (buy)

GRAMMAR POSTS

Now that you have seen Remember + gerund or infinitive, take a look at our other grammar posts:
Grammar: Would you mind?
Grammar: Multi Word Verbs

Answers

  1. to call
  2. visiting
  3. playing
  4. to pick up
  5. to finish
  6. meeting
  7. to renew
  8. going, buying
  9. to order
  10. to buy
English Vocabulary: Spot-on

English Vocabulary: Spot-on

English Vocabulary: Spot-on. Here is one of those words that really doesn’t have a specific translation in Spanish, although there are lots of words you could use in its place. You could say correcto (although correct exists in English), you could say precisamente (althouth precise exists in English). Basically spot–on is a way to say you are exactly right, emphasizing how impressed I am with how accurate something is.

SPOT-ON

  • to describe something that is exactly right
  • used to emphasize surprise at how accurate something is
    • You were spot-on about Josh. He really is generous with everyone.
    • Your predictions about the course were spot-on. The teacher is excellent and I am really enjoying it.
    • Unfortunetly, your predictions about the end of the year sales were spot-on. We will have to lay people off next year.

Cursos inglés Vitoria

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava, tenemos cursos de inglés para todas las necesidades y niveles. Puedes ver todos los cursos aquí. Para poder apuntarse a un grupo, pincha aquí o ponte en contacto con nosotros: idiomas@camaradealava.com, 945 150 190

English Vocabulary

Now that you have seen English Vocabulary: Spot-on, have a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: foresight
Vocab Rehab: sign up

English Expression: Bear in mind

English Expression: Bear in Mind

English Expression: Bear in mind. When speaking to adults, you don’t always want to tell them to ‘Remember…’ or ‘Don’t forget…’. So, instead we can use this nice expression to tell someone to take something into consideration.

BEAR IN MIND

  • to take something into consideration
  • to remember something when you are making a decision.
    • Please bear in mind that you only have 2 weeks to return the product.
    • Before we buy the refrigerator we need to bear in mind that we may also need to buy a wash machine soon.
    • Bearning in mind that she’s so young, she really knows how to play the violin.

KEEP IN MIND

  • this expression is the same as bear in mind.
    • Keep in mind that the plane leaves very late at night.
    • He told me to keep him in mind if we have a job opening.

English Expressions

Now that you have seen English Expression: Bear in mind, take a look at our other Expression Session Posts:
Expression Session: brush up on something
Expression Session: neither here nor there

Cursos Inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Alava tenemos cursos para todos los niveles y necesidades. Para recibir más información sobre los cursos, ponte en contacto con nosotros: idiomas@camaradealava.com, llamar a 945 150 190 o inscribirte aquí.

  • Business English
  • Preparación de Exámenes de Cambridge, EILTS, Oxford Test of English
  • Inglés General
English emails: I'm writing

English Emails: I’m writing

English emails: I’m writing. When writing emails in Spanish, it’s quite common to use Present Simple: I write… However, in English we use Present Continuous to write about something that is happening in the moment. I’m writing this blog post right now, so I use Present Continuous.

EMAILS

Starting emails

Since I am writing an email in the moment, we use Present Continuous. To start the email, say:

  • I’m writing you in reference to the conference that is taking place next month.
  • I’m writing you in response to your questions about the fair.

Attachments

We can also use the present continuous to talk about an attachment to an email:

  • I’m attaching the documents you requested earlier today.
  • As requested, I’m attaching a copy of the budget.

Talking about yourself

Remember, we use Present Continuous to talk about things we are doing in the moment, so if you are talking about something happening now in your life, use present continuous:

  • I’m working a lot right now since I just started a new job.
  • I’m living in a nice apartment about 15 minutes from the center.

Writing Rules

Now that you have learned about English Emails: I’m writing, take a look at our other Writing Rules posts:
Writing rules: Gerunds that follow to
Writing rules: B2 Writing tips: RED

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava, tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades. Para inscribirte en un curso o para recibir más información, rellena la hoja aquí.

English Vocabulary: foresight

English Vocabulary: foresight

English Vocabulary: foresight. someone who has foresight is not a magician or a fortune teller. It is simply someone who can read a situation, judge what the possible outcomes may be and learns to plan in a way for this situation. Some people may have foresight at work but not with relationships, or vice versa. Other people may be able to see what is going to happen but don’t know how to plan for that situation. Someone with foresight can do both.

HAVE THE FORESIGHT (noun)

  • to have ability to understand a situation and it’s possible outcomes and
  • be able to plan for this situation
    • He had the foresight to leave his job before they went bankrupt.
    • If Carol had the foresight to sell the house before the market crash, she should have had the foresight to save some money as well.

FORESEE (verb)

  • to be able to judge a situation and make plans to deal with it.
    • He didn’t forsee the divorce at all, so he was shocked when his wife told him.
    • They forsaw the war and made plans to leave the country as soon as they could.

(UN)FORESEEABLE (adjective)

  • foreseeable: an event or situation that can be predicted
    • She will be working in the school for the forseeable future.
  • unforseeable: an event or situation that can not be predicted.
    • I lost my job last month, so for the unforseeable future, I will be unemployed.

Vocab Rehab

Now that you have seen English Vocabulary: foresight, have a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: sign up
Vocab Rehab: steal vs rob

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava, tenemos cursos de inglés para todos las necesidades y niveles. Mira nuestras cursos aquí.

Curso de inglés C1 Advanced

Curso de inglés C1 Advanced

Curso de inglés C1 Advanced. En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Alava ofrecemos cursos de inglés para adultos. Aprender con profesionales que te ayudarán a conseguir tus objetivos.

Curso C1

En el curso de C1 :

  • Review more advanced grammatical features of the English language, specifically exam related tasks including inversions, mixed conditionals, and much more
  • Build vocabulary and be able to express yourself in a more clear and advanced manner
  • Use subtle differences to express a variety of emotions and understanding.
  • Listen to authentic materials to be able to follow colloquial conversations
  • Know when and how to use language to show formality or informality in different situations
  • Write with confidence and clarity

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava, tenemos una variedad de cursos para todos los edades y necesidades. Pincha aquí para ver nuestros cursos.

  • Cursos de Preparación de Exámenes de nivel A2, B1, B2, C1 y C2
  • Business English. Inglés para negocios, nivel B1, B2, C1
  • Curso de conversación nivel B2 y C1
  • Inglés General A2, B1, B2, C1, C2

Si estás interesado en el Curso de inglés C1 Advanced, ponte en contacto con nosotros: idiomas@camaradecomercio.com o llamando 945 150 190
Para inscribirte en el curso, pincha aquí

Curso de conversación inglés

Curso de conversación inglés

Curso de conversación inglés. Los jueves de 17:30 a 19:00 empezamos cursos de conversación en inglés en la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava en la Calle Manuel Iradier 17. Se consiste de un grupo reducido.

¿Que hacemos en un curso de conversación?

Primero te digo lo que no son los cursos de conversación. No son solo de conversar libremente. Por eso tienes amigos.

En los cursos de conversación:

  • leemos artículos sobre current events y hablamos del impacto
  • aprendemos vocabulario nuevo y lo ponemos en práctica
  • vemos vídeos cortos y ofrecemos nuestros opiniones
  • hablamos en confianza y sin ser juzgados por nuestro nivel de inglés
  • recibimos feedback sobre la gramática, pronunciación y vocabulario que usamos
  • incrementa nuestro nivel de fluidez
  • trabajamos las dos áreas que nos cuesta más ya que no vivimos en un país donde se habla inglés habitualmente – la escucha y la habla

Cursos de inglés

Ya que has visto Curso de conversación inglés, puedes ver los de más cursos de inglés que ofrecemos aquí.

Inscríbete en nuestros cursos aquí o ponte en contacto con nosotros a idiomas@camaradealava.com

  • Preparación de Examenes: B1, B2, C1, C2
  • Business English: B2, C1, C2
  • Inglés General: A2, B1, B2, C1, C2
English Expression: Brush up on something

English Expression: brush up on something

English Expression: Brush up on something. It’s that time of year to brush up on your English. Hay cursos de inglés para todos los niveles este trimestre, así que no lo pierdes.

BRUSH UP ON SOMETHING

  • to improve your knowledge or skill on a topic that you previously learned.
  • to remember information or skills that you once knew.
    • I really need to brush up on my French. I was in France and kept using Spanish.
    • We are signing her up for a IT coourse to brush up on her skills before she returns to work.

English Expressions

Now that you have seen English Expression: Brush up on something, take a look at our other Expression Session posts:
Expression Session: neither here nor there
Expression Session: dodge the bullet

CURSOS INGLES

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades. También somos un Centro Examinador del Oxford Test of English, una prueba de nivel de A2, B1 y B2 con certificado. Para recibir más información sobre nuestros servicios de inglés, escribe a idiomas@camaradealava.com o llamar a 945 150 190.

  • Cursos para niveles A1, A2, B1, B2, C1 y C2
  • Inglés para negocios / Business English
  • Curos InCompany for empresas
  • Preparación de exámenes de Cambridge, EOI, EILTS, Oxford Test of English
  • Mantenimiento de nivel para B2, C1 y C2
Cursos gratuitos de inglés

Cursos gratuitos de inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava tenemos una oferta de Cursos gratuitos de inglés desde octubre a diciembre 2023. Los cursos están 100% subvencionados por el Departamento de Trabajo y Empleo de Gobierno Vasco, organizados por el Ayuntamiento dentro de su plan de logística e impartidos por la Cámara de Comercio.

CURSOS DE PREPARACIÓN DE EXÁMENES

1. Inglés: Preparación certificaciones de Oxford. Nivel básico A2.

  • lunes y miércoles de 16:30 a 19:00
  • Inscribirte aquí

2. Inglés: Preparación certificaciones de Oxford y Cambridge. Nivel B1/B2

  • martes y jueves de 18:00 a 19:30
  • Inscribirte aquí

3. Inglés: Preparación certificaciones de Oxford y Cambridge. Nivel C1

  • martes y jueves de 10:00 a 11:30
  • Inscribirte aquí

CURSOS DE NEGOCIOS

1. LogisticS Business English (BASIC – nivel B1)

  • Lunes y miércoles de 19:30 a 21:00
  • Inscribirte aquí

2. Logistic and foreign trade Business English – intensivo ( UPPER-INTERMEDIATE)

  • Viernes de 16:30 a 19:30
  • Inscribirte aquí

Cursos de inglés

En la Escuela de idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio, tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades. Ya que has visto Cursos gratuitos de inglés, puedes ver los de más cursos aquí.

Ponte en contacto con nosotros: idiomas@camaradealava.com o llamar a 945 150 190.

English Vocabulary: Sign up

English Vocabulary: sign up

English Vocabulary: sign up. This phrasal verb is a very important one to know. This month you need to SIGN UP for English class, dance class, art class or any other activity that you are hoping to be a part of. My kids always make the mistake of saying to me, ‘Did you inscribirme in the class?’ And I respond, ‘No, I signed you up.’ It’s such a basic phrase, but even they never seem to use it.

SIGN UP

  • Phrasal verb. Learn more about how to use phrasal verbs here.
  • to join or agree to be a part of an activity or event.
    • I signed my daughter up for dance class.
    • Julie signed up for the marathon.

Vocab Rehab

Now that you have learned about English Vocabulary: sign up, take a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: steal vs rob
Vocab Rehab: to be promoted

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava, tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades. Puedes mirar nuestros cursos y horarios aquí o pónte en contacto con nosotros a idiomas@camaradealava.com

  • Inglés General A2, B1, B2, C1, C2
  • Inglés para negocios (Business English) A2, B1, B2, C1, C2
  • Preparación de exámenes de Cambridge, Oxford Test of English y EOI