Curso de Inglés Gratuito

Curso de Inglés Gratuito

Curso de Inglés Gratuito. En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Álava, anualmente ofrecemos el curso SKILLS FOR INTERNATIONAL SALES que 100% subvencionado. Quiere decir que este curso de 40 horas te va a salir gratis. Inscribirte aquí

Información sobre el curso de inglés gratuito

  • FECHA: 12 a 21 de septiembre de 2023
  • HORARIO: 09:00 a 14:00, lunes a jueves
  • TOTAL DE HORAS: 40 horas
  • DONDE: en la Escuela de Formación de la Cámara de Comercio de Álava en Vitoria-Gasteiz. Pincha aquí para ver donde estamos
  • PARA QUIEN: damos prioridad a gente desempleado pero todos/as mayores de 16 que tengan un nivel B2 (certificado no es necesario) están bienvenidos/as
  • QUIEN: Las profesoras y los profesores cualificadas/os y con experiencia
  • COMO: inscríbete aquí

¿Qué aprendo en este curso de inglés?

Cada día es más importante hablar en público. No solo en conferencias, pero enfrente de tu jefe durante una reunión o vendiendo tu producto a otra empresa. Así que el primer módulo de este curso esta diseñado a ayudarte en estos momentos.

Módulo 1

  • Provide the necessary tools to inform, inspire and entertain your audience.
  • How to engage your audience from the very beginning.
  • Pay attention to body language
  • How to use vidual aids effectively
  • How to guide your audience throughout your speech
  • How to deal with questions from the audience

Módulo 2

  • Define the stages and elements of the negotiation process
  • Develop the skills and techniques of a successful negotiator
  • Identify optimal win-win solutions in negotiations and make profitable deals
  • Differentiate negotation styles and mental models, analyze their own and their partner’s behaviour in negotiations.
  • Learn about cross-cultural differences in negotiations
  • Communicate through emails, chats, video-conferences and telephone

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava tenemos cursos para todos los niveles y necesidades. También ofrecemos el Oxford Test of English ya que somos un centro examinador. Aprender más sobre el Oxford Test of English para certificar tu nivel de A2, B1 y B2 aquí.

English: gerunds that follow to

English: Gerunds that follow to

English: gerunds that follow to

English: gerunds that follow to. Gerunds and Infinitives are always difficult to remember (click here for more on gerunds vs infintives). They are also a large part of the B2 and C1 exams for Cambridge, Oxford, EILTS, EOI and so on. And let’s not forget that we use gerunds and infinitives all the time in geral conversation. So, yes, they are important. But, let’s not forget that sometimes gerunds follow ‘to’ (when functioning as a preposition). Here are just a few of the most common examples.

TO BE LOOKING FORWARD TO

  • Mostly used at the end of an email but is also in spoken English
    • Looking forward to meeting you (Notice that we do not use the subject here. This is less formal)
    • We are looking forward to working with you. (This is more formal because we use the subject ‘we’)

BE USED TO / GET USED TO

English: gerunds that follow to
  • Be used to (estar acostumbrada a). To show that you doing something regularly. It also means that you enjoy it.
    • She’s used to waking up early because he does it every day
  • Get used to (acostubrandose). To show you are trying to make something a habit and enjoy it
    • I’m getting used to living in a small town, but it is still difficult sometimes.
  • Click here for more about these two phrases

COMMITTED TO / DEDICATED TO

  • Committed to and dedicated to both mean that you are willing to give your time and energy to something
    • We have politicians that are very dedicated to cleaning up the city.
    • I am fully committed to doing a good job on the exam.

CONFESSED TO / GET AROUND TO

  • Confessed to means that you have admitted that you have done something wrong.
    • Joe confessed to taking the computer home with him.
  • Get around to doing something means that you have done soemthing you have been wanting to do for a long time.
    • I never got around to learning French.

Writing rules

Now that you have seen English: gerunds that follow to, take a look at our other Writing Rules posts:
Writing Rules: RED
Writing Rules: Mr., Miss, Mrs, Ms

Cursos de inglés en Vitoria

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava tenemos clases de inglés para todos tus necesidades.

  • Business English / Inglés para negocios
    • InCompany
    • Online
    • Face to face
  • General English / Inglés general
  • Exam Prep / preparación de exámenes de Cambrdige, EILTS, EOI, Oxford Test of English

English Vocabulary: steal vs rob

English Vocabulary: steal vs rob

English Vocabulary: steal vs rob. These words have a lot in common, but there is a clear difference.

STEAL

  • irregular verb: steal, stole, stolen
  • take objects from someone or something without their permission.
    • He stole the wallet from my purse.
    • My computer was stolen yesterday at school.

ROB

  • regular verb: rob, robbed, robbed
  • robbery happens to people or places.
    • He robbed me in the bar.
    • They robbed the bank before getting away.

English Vocabulary

Now that you learned about English Vocabulary: steal vs rob, take a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: to be promoted
Vocab Rehab: hear vs listen

Cursos inglés en Vitoria

Si quieres certificar tu nivel de inglés, mejorar tus posibilidades de trabajar o simplemente mantener tu nivel, tenemos curos para todos las necesidades y niveles en la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio. Pincha aquí para saber más. Ponte en contacto con nosotros a idiomas@camaradealava.com.

  • Cursos de preparación para los exámenes de Cambridge B2, C1, C2 y Oxford Test of English A2, B1, B2
  • Business English Courses – Cursos para negocios
    • presencial y online
    • InComany – cursos deseñados para ti y tu empresa
  • Inglés de mantenimiento B2, C1 y C2
  • Cursos de inglés general
B2 Writing tips: RED

B2 Writing Tips: RED

B2 Writing tips: RED. Most people do not do well on the writing part of the exam. This is simply because we do not add enough RED: reasons, examples and details. The great thing about using reasons, examples and details is that you are also more likely to use connectors such as: and, but, so, because, etc.

REASONS

Writing rules: Reasons
  • In both the writing and the speaking section of the exam, you should always give reasons.
  • Never answer ‘yes’ or ‘no’
  • Always say why you can or can’t do something.
    • I wish I could go but I don’t have any money on me. Maybe another time.
    • I would love to go. I’ve been wanting to go there for over a year now.

EXAMPLES

  • Elaborate.
  • Give examples of what you want to do or where you want to go
    • I feel uncomfortable speaking English. Mainly it’s because I get nervous but I also am embarrassed about my accent.
    • I don’t think we should go to the meeting. They said it was only for serior staff members and we should have received an invitation.
Writing rules: examples

DETAILS

  • Don’t be vague. Offer more details.
    • My flight lands at 10PM in Bilbao. It’s a direct flight from Madrid. The flight number is ES1234.
    • My house is next to the big park on the north side of the city. It’s in front of the Children’s Public School on 5th street.

Writing Rules

Now that you have seen B2 Writing tips: RED, take a look at our other Writing Rules posts:
Writing Rules: Mr., Mrs, Miss and Ms.

Cursos Inglés Vitoria

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Álava tenemos cursos para todas las necesidades y niveles:

  • Certificar tu nivel con el Oxford Test of English
  • Preparación de exámenes de Cambridge B2 , C1 y C2
  • Business English / Inglés para negocios
    • Cursos anuales
    • InCompany
    • online y presencial
  • Inglés general
English Expression: neither here nor there

English Expression: Neither here nor there

English Expression: neither here nor there. Want a nice way to say ‘ what you are saying is irrelevant’? Here is your expression. Although, like so many expressions in Enlgish, be careful with your tone.

NEITHER HERE NOR THERE

  • Used to say that something is not important
  • somethng is not relevant to the currect conversation or problem.
    • Whether she was drinking or not is neither here nor there. I just want to know if she is safe.
    • His looks are neither here nor there. I just want to know if he is a nice guy.
    • Their nationality is neither here nor there. Can they work?

English Expressions

Now that you have seen English Expression: neither here nor there, take a look at our other Expression Session posts:
Expression Session: dodge the bullet
Expression Session: hang in there

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Alava, tenemos todos tipos de cursos para las personas de 16 a 99 años.

  • Cursos de preparación de exámenes de Cambridge y Oxford B1, B2, C1, C2
  • Inglés General A2, B1, B2, C1, C2
  • Inglés para negocios / Business English A2, B1, B2, C1

Para ver más sobre los cursos que ofrecemos, pincha aquí.

English Vocabulary: to be promoted

English Vocabulary: to be promoted

English Vocabulary: to be promoted. Today we celebrate the fact that our local football club, Alaves has been promoted to First Division! ¡Aupa Alaves! Click here to read more about Vitoria-Gasteiz’s Alaves team, but before you do that, let’s take a look at the different meanings of promote. Also, check out the collocations used with promote.

TO BE PROMOTED

  • to raise someone to a more important position
  • Usually someone is promoted to something
    • John has just been promoted to the head of his department, so we are having a party for him.
    • If the team wins the next game, then they will be promoted to 2nd Division.

TO PROMOTE

  • to encourage people to like and/or buy a product
    • Kristen is promoting a new line of cosmetics, so you should buy from her.
    • If you really want to promote your product well, you should talk to an advertising company.
  • To encourage people to like and support an idea.
    • The world leaders really need to promote the idea of taking care of the planet or else there will never be real change.
    • They promote peace talks between the two countries.

COLLOCATIONS WITH PROMOTE

  • adverbs that collocate with promote
    • actively, positively, widely
      • We are actively promoting English classes, so sign up today.
    • aggressively, heavily,
      • I’m not sure I agree with such aggressive promoting, but I see that it is effective.
    • effectively, successfully
      • The company is successfully promoting the product nationally and plans to go international.
  • nouns that collocate with promote
    • access, diversity, equality, human rights, awareness
      • I do all I can to promote diversity and inclusion at work and at home.
    • efficiency, innovation, education,
      • If the government really wants to promote innovation, they need to provide more grant money to start up businesses.
    • business, growth, development
      • The new mayor says she want to promote growth, so she is presenting a new bill.
    • competition, debate, dialogue, trade
      • If we don’t promote dialogue and debate, then we will never grow as a country.

English Vocabulary

Now that you saw ‘English Vocabulary: to be promoted‘, take a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: hear vs listen
Vocab Rehab: raise, rise, arise

Cursos de inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Álava, tenemos cursos para todos los niveles y necesidades. Contáctanos a idiomas@camaradealava.com. Tenemos cursos online y presencial para mayores de 16 años.

English Expression: Burn the candle at both ends

English Expression: Burn the candle at both ends

English Expression: Burn the candle at both ends. Sometimes saying you’re exhausted dosn’t really express exactly how you are feeling. That’s when expressions like this one come in handy.

BURN THE CANDLE AT BOTH ENDS

  • to do a lot of work in a small amount of time.
  • to work from the early morning until late in the evening.
    • I am studying and working full time, so I am really burning the candle at both ends right now.
    • In Japan, it is quite normal for employees to burn the candle at both ends.

Where does it come from?

This expression was translated from French in the 1600’s. Candles were very expensive, so if someone was burning the candle from both ends, their money was dissapearing very quickly. You are being wasteful.

Now the expression had been adapted and the candle represents light. If you wake up early in the morning, the sun hasn’t come up yet and you need a candle to work. If you are still working at night then you also need to use the candle. Maybe now we are wasting our days working too much!

English Expressions

Now that you have seen English Expression: Burn the candle at both ends, take a look at our other Expression Session posts:
Expression Session: Dodge the bullet
Expression Session: Hang in there

English Vocabulary: hear vs Listen

English Vocabulary: hear vs listen

English Vocabulary: hear vs listen. These two verbs get mixed up all the time. So, let’s look at how they are different and how they are similar.

HEAR

  • Irregular, Transitive and Intransitive verb
  • Think of ‘hear’ as an event.
    • I heard what the Prime Minister said yesterday. The focus is on the event of the Prime Minister, not that I heard it.
  • You receive a sound / you are conscious of a sound
    • Did you hear that? I think someone is at the door.
  • You understand a piece of information
    • He heard they are getting a divorce.

LISTEN

  • Regular, transitive verb
  • Usually followed by ‘to’
  • Think of listen to as an action.
  • He never listens to me when I’m speaking. It’s so annoying. (The focus is on the action of listening.)
  • To give your attention to someone or something.
    • I listened to the whole album and I love it.

HEAR OR LISTEN

Sometimes we can use both hear or listen in a sentence. However, the meaning changes a bit.

  • Remember, we use ‘hear’ to focus on the activity and ‘listen’ to focus on the action.
    • I love hearing the rain hitting the window. (the focus is on the rain hitting the window)
    • I love listening to the rain hitting the window. (the focus is on listening)

English Vocabulary

Now that you have read about English Vocabulary: hear vs listen, take a look at our other vocabulary based posts:
Vocab Rehab: Raise, Rise, Arise
Vocab Rehab: Backlash

Cursos de inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Álava, tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades.

English Expressions: Dodge the Bullet

English Expressions: Dodge the Bullet

English Expressions: Dodge the Bullet. As you can see in the photo, a bullet (una bala) is what comes out of a gun (pistola). To dodge something is to avoid something by jumping out of the way quickly. The expression comes from the idea that if you get out of the way of a bullet, you can save your life. Although the expression isn’t used in this way today, it does refer to dodging something bad.

DODGE THE BULLET

  • To avoid an unpleasant situation or even danger
    • I’m so glad she broke up with him. She really dodged the bullet because he has a terrible reputation.
    • We really dodged a bullet by not going on vacation because there was a hurricane where we

English Expressions

Now that you have seen English Expressions: Dodge the Bullet, take a look at our other Expression Session posts:
Expression Session: Hang in there
Expression Session: Hammer out the details

Cursos de inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades. Pincha aquí para apuntarte ahora o escribirnos a idiomas@camaradealava.com

  • Cursos de preparación de exámenes de A2 a C1
  • Oxford Test of English – www.oxfordtestofenglish.es
  • Cursos de preparación para el Oxford Test of English
  • Business English
  • In Company – cursos deseñados para ti y tu empresa
  • Inglés General
  • C1/C2 Mantenimiento
English Vocabulary: Raise Rise Arose

English Vocabulary: Raise, Rise, Arise

English Vocabulary: Raise, Rise, Arise. These three verbs can be very confusing. So, let’s break them down one by one.

Raise

English Vocabulary: Raise
  • Raise is a regular verb, which means that raised is the past and past participle.
  • It is a transitive verb which means that an object must follow the verb. This is the main difference between raise and rise. To learn more about transitive verbs click here.
  • We need to raise something.
    • He raised his hand. (hand is the object)
    • The government raised taxes (taxes is the object)

Rise

  • Rise is a irregular verb. Rose is the past tense and risen the past participle.
  • It is intransitive, so it is not followed by an object. Click here to learn more.
  • The temperature is rising. (no object needed)
  • She rose. (no object needed)
English Vocabulary: Rise

Arise

English Vocabulary: Arise
  • Arise, like rise, is an irregular verb. Arose is the past tense and arisen is the past participle .
  • It is also intransitive, so it is not followed by an object.
  • Arise means that something presents itself.
    • Should the need arise, … (should the need present itself…)

Collocations

It’s important to learn vocabulary in context. So, here are some of the words that tend to ‘collocate’ with Raise, Rise and Arise.

Raise

  • a question, a point,
  • I would like to raise a question here.
  • your hand, her leg, their heads
    • Please raise your hand if you know the answer.
  • standards
    • If you want to past the audit, your company must raise its standards.

Rise

  • dramatically, markedly, sharply, significantly, steeply, substantially
    • Profits rose substantially in the third quarter.
  • a little, slightly, higher, steadily, fast, quickly, rapidly
    • Sales dropped rapidly during the pandemic.
  • be expected to, be likely/unlikely to, be projected to, be set to, begin to, continue to
    • The number of people is unlikely to rise this late in the year.
  • above, by, from, in, in line with, to

Arise

  • naturally, spontaneously, directly
    • Sometime bad behaviour at school arises spontaneously.
  • may, might, be linkely to, be unlikely to
    • Disagreements are likely to arise out of a debate.
  • from, out of

English Vocabulary

Now that you have seen, English Vocabulary: Raise, Rise, Arise, have a look at our other posts:
Vocab Rehab: backlash
Vocab Rehab: strike

Transitive and Intransitive Verbs

Transitive and Intransitive Verbs in less than 5 minutes

Learn about Transitive and Intransitive Verbs in less than 5 minutes.

TRANSITIVE VERBS / VERBOS TRANSITIVOS

  • Verbos que deben ir seguidos de un objeto directo.
  • Si el verbo transitivo no va seguido de un objeto, sonará extraño.
  • Ejemplo:
I love… (Who or what do you love?) Amo… (A quien o que amas?)
I love tennis Me encanta el tenis.
I love books Me encantan los libros
I love you Te quiero a ti.
  • Ejemplo 2:
She’s wearing… (What is he wearing?)Ella lleva puesto… (¿Qué lleva puesto?)
She’s wearing a suit to work Ella lleva un traje al trabajo
Jenny’s wearing a t-shirt today Jenny lleva hoy una camiseta
He’s wearing pijamas. Lleva un pijama

INTRANSITIVE VERBS / VERBOS INTRANSITIVOS

  • Verbos que no necesitan ir seguidos de un objeto directo.
  • Ejemplo
We arrived Llegamos
He lied Él mintió
I criedYo lloré
The sun rose at 5:24 (at 5:24 answers when, so it is not a D.O.)El sol se levanta a las 5:24 (a las 5:25 responde a cuando, por lo que no es un objeto directo.
Mary is sleeping on the couch (on the couch answers where, so it is not a D.O)Mary está durmiendo en el sofá (en el sofá responde a donde, por lo que no es un objeto directo.

DIRECT OBJECT / OBJETO DIRECTO

  • Sustantivo o pronombre que recibe la acción.
  • Suele escribirse como D.O.
  • El D.O. responde a la pregunta QUIÉN o QUÉ recibió la acción del verbo

Verbos que son transitivo e intransitivo

A veces un verbo puede ser tanto TRANSITIVO como INTRANSITIVO, dependiendo de su uso.

TRANSITIVE / TRANSITIVOINTRANSITIVE /INTRANSITIVO
Lucia plays basketball every Monday and Wednesday / Lucía juega al baloncesto todos los lunes y miércolesLucia plays outside. / Lucía juega fuera.
We will continue the meeting after lunch. / Continuaremos la reunión después del almuerzo.After lunch the meeting continued. / Tras el almuerzo, la reunión continuó.

More examples / Mas ejemplos

  • OTHER TRANSITIVE VERBS
    • address
    • borrow
    • bring
    • discuss
    • give
    • lend
  • OTHER INTRANSITIVE VERBS
    • Die
    • Live
    • Rain
    • Smile
    • Stand
    • Wait

Grammar Videos

Now that you have seen this grammar video, take a look at our other posts:
Grammar Video: Frequency adverbs in less than 5 minutes
Grammar Video: Embedded questions in less than 5 minutes

Cursos Ingles

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Álava tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades. Ponte en contacto con nosotros para saber más idiomas@camaradealava.com

English Vocabulary: Backlash

English Vocabulary: Backlash

English Vocabulary: Backlash. Some say that all social issues face backlash at a certain moment. What kinds of rights are facing backlash by you?

BACKLASH

  • A reaction that goes against a previously popular idea or person.
  • A reverse movement.
  • a negative reaction to something
    • There has been a backlash against women’s rights in the US.
    • Governments who make very liberal or very conservative laws often face a lot of backlash from opposing sides and from their own side if they think their ideas are too extreme.

COLLOCATIONS WITH BACKLASH

Collocations are words that go together. Stop learning vocabulary by itself and learn it with the words that are used with it. Learning this way will also help you memorize the words more easily.

VERBS

  • Experience, face
    • The government is facing a backlash from Feminist Movements on both sides.
    • She is experiencing a backlash for not having consulted her partners.
  • Cause, create, prompt, provoke, spark
    • The gas company provoked a backlash for increasing their prices.
    • It was quite predictable that his message was going to spark a backlash from his voters.
  • Anticipate, expect, fear, predict
    • They should have anticipated the backlash and had a strategy to deal with it.
    • Even though she feared a backlash, she went ahead with the new regulation.

ADJECTIVES

  • Consumer
    • They promted a consumer backlash by not giving employees paid holidays.
  • Political
    • The Right is experiencing political backlash for having attacked their party’s famous icon.
  • Public
    • There will be strong public backlash to the increased retirement age.
  • Violent, racist, serious
    • Many States are facing a violent backlash from anti-immigrant supporters.
    • After COVID, many member of the Asian community incorrectly received racist backlash.

ENGLISH VOCABULARY

Now that you have seen English Vocabulary: Backlash, check out our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: strike
Vocab Rehab: sibling

Would you mind?

Would you mind?

Would you mind? Although this seems like a very simple phrase, it can get quite confusing. M1nd in this question means ‘to bother’ or ‘molestar‘ in Spanish. The tricky part is in the answer. No, it doesn’t bother me or yes, it does bother me.

ASKING FOR PERMISSION

This is an indirect way of asking for permission for something. It is quite commonly used in English. Pay special attention to the answers.

DO YOU MIND?

Informal question

Do/Does (someone) mind + if + subject + present simple

  • Informal way to ask if something bothers you or makes you uncomfortable.
    • Do you mind if I call you Joe? (Does it bother you if I call you Joe?
    • No, I don’t. (You can call me Joe)
    • Yes, I do. (I don’t want you to call me Joe.
Do you mind if he comes? ¿Te importa que venga?informal
No, I don’t No, no me importa
Yes, I do Si me importa.

WOULD (someone) MIND?

Would (someone) mind + if + subject + present simple

  • Polite way to ask permission from someone, by asking if it bothers them.
    • Would he mind if I use his phone? (Can I use his phone?)
    • No, he wouldn’t. (You can use it)
    • Yes, he would. (I don’t want you to use it.)
Would you mind?
Would she mind if we met after class? ¿Le importaría si quedamos después de clase?Polite
No, she wouldn’t. No, no le importaría.
Yes, she would. Si, si le importaría.

Would (someone) mind if + past simple

Polite and Formal question

Would someone m1nd + if + subject + past simple

  • Would she m1nd if we didn’t go together (Would it bother her if we went separately?)
  • No, she wouldn’t. (we can go separately)
  • Yes, she would. (I would rather go together)
Would he mind if we arrived late? ¿Le importaría que llegáramos tarde?Polite and Formal
No, he wouldn’t No, no le importaría.
Yes, he would. Si le importaría.

Would (someone) mind + me/my + ing… ?

  • Would they mind me leaving early? (Will it bother them if I leave perfore expected?)
  • No, they wouldn’t (It is OK if you leave early)
  • Yes, they would. (I will not be happy if you leave early)
Polite and formal

REQUESTING HELP

We can also use this question form to politely request help from someone.

WOULD (someone) M1ND + ING

Polite

Would (someone) mind + ing…?

  • Would Carol mind picking up my daughter from school? (Can Carol and/or does Carol want to get my daughter from school?)
  • No, she wouldn’t (I can get her)
  • Yes, she would. (I can’t or do not want to get her)

ANSWERING NO OR YES

As you have seen in the previous examples, you can answer these types of questions with ‘Yes, I do/would’ or ‘No, I don’t/wouldn’t’. However, it quite common to use some of the following phrases as well.

NO

  • Of course not
  • Not a problem
  • No, I can do it.
  • Sorry, but I can’t
  • I would, but I …
  • It’s not that I m1nd, I just can’t.

English Grammar

Take a look at our other Grammar posts:
Grammar: Multi- Word Verbs
Grammar: Reflexive Pronouns

Cursos de inglés

En la Cámara de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio, tenemos clases para todos los niveles y necesidades. Ponte en contacto con nosotras a idiomas@camaradealava.com o ver nuestros cursos pinchando aquí

English Expressions: Hang in there

English Expressions: Hang in there

English Expressions: Hang in there. It’s May, the weather is getting nice and we still need to make it through some months before we can enjoy the summer. Hang in there!!! You can do it.

HANG IN THERE

  • A way to tell someone to keep trying even if things are difficult
  • Used to encourage someone to not give up.
    • I know it has been a rough month, but hang in there. Let me know if I can help with anything.
    • I know you are tired, but hang in there. You only have 5 more minutes left.

ENGLISH EXPRESSIONS

Now that you have seen English Expressions: Hang in there, take a look at our other Expression Session posts:
Expression Session: Hammer out the details
Expression Session: Catch someone’s eye

CURSOS DE INGLÉS

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Álava, tenemos cursos de todos tipos. Pónte en contacto con nosotros: idiomas@camaradealava.com

  • Preparación de Exámenes de Cambridge, EOI y Oxford Test of English
  • Business English – Inglés para el negocio
    • Cursos presenciales y online
    • Cursos InCompany, especializados para ti y tu negocio
  • Inglés General
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English Vocabulary: Strike

English Vocabulary: Strike

English Vocabulary: Strike. May 2nd is an International Worker’s Rights Day. In countries all over the world, people are striking for better working conditions and better pay. There are many ways to use the word strike, so let’s take a look at some of them.

STRIKE (verb)

  • to refuse to continue working due to an arguement with your boss. Usaully over working conditions, pay, etc.
  • One person or a group of people can strike.
    • We are striking for better working conditions.
    • The teachers strike every year on the same day to raise awareness about a variety of educational concerns.
  • Strike can also mean to forcefully hit someone or something
    • He is in jail after striking a woman on the street for no reason.
    • Julie struck the football so hard that it hot the back wall.
  • Something that happens all of a sudden and has a major impact, usually negative.
    • The lightning struck the building and killed three people.
    • The storm is moving fast and they say it will strike within the hour.

GO ON STRIKE

  • Same meaning as strike.
    • The French workers are going on strike this weekend.
    • They went on strike last week.

STRIKE (NOUN)

  • A perdiod of time that a worker does not work due to arguement with management about working conditions, pay, etc.
    • The man died in prison after a 90-day hunger strike.
    • The workers are calling for a nationwide strike to happen next month.
  • A strong hit
    • The strike to his head may cause permanent damage.
    • The building was damaged by the lightning strikes.

Other meanings and collocations with strike

  • The clock strikes midnight in 5 minutes! (sounds a bell or turns that time)
  • He struck out their best hitter (baseball reference)
  • In baseball you only have three stikes and you’re out!
  • She stuck the ball as hard as she could. (hit the ball hard)
  • They said it wasn’t a good idea to teach children how to strike a match. (light a match)
  • I’m so mad I want to strike them from the list of attendees. (to take someone off a list)
  • When the country struck oil, everyone suddenly wanted to be their best friends. (found oil)
  • We finally struck a deal with them and we start work on Monday. (made an agreement)
  • Doesn’t it strike you as odd that she never even called? (to seem strange)
  • Although my partner didn’t want me too, I decided to take part in the strike. (join the strike)
  • There have been so many air strikes in the last week that I think most of the people have left the city. (military attacks from the air)

English Vocabulary

Now that you have seen English Vocabulary: strike, take a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: Sibling
Vocab Rehab: decimal point

English Roundtable Discussion

English Rountable Discussion

Join us for an English Rountable Discussion. We will be thinking about why it is valuable to know where we really want to go. Also, why is it important to know this before you get there.

DETAILS

When: May 4th, from 18:00 to 19:30
Where: Manuel Iradier 17, Vitoria
How to register: Please sign up for the event here.

WHO WILL BE SPEAKING

Annie Hintz – I am happy to be hosting this roundtable discussion at the Chamber of Commerce in Alava where I work. As host I hope to open up the discussion to everyone so we can all enjoy a hearty conversation and in English.

There will be three other English teachers involved in the roundtable and an Associate Profesor at UPV/EHU

Learn more about them here:
Annie Hintz
Blessing Osudji

Olga Fernández
John Hird
Martin Holland

WHAT IS THE TOPIC?

We will be thinking about why it is valuable to know where we really want to go. Also, why is it important to know this before you get there.

Registration

Don’t forget to register here for the English Rountable Discussion.

Learn English

While you are here, take a look at some of our posts teaching vocabulary, expressions and grammar.
Vocab Rehab: Sibling
Expression Session: Hammer out the details
Grammar: Multi-word verbs