Stative Verbs in English

Stative Verbs in English

Stative Verbs in English

Stative Verbs in English. Stative verbs (or State verbs) refer to verbs that describe a state, not an action. These are verbs that we rarely use in the Present Continuous form since they do not show actions. Having said that, this is changing, as languages often do. Below you can learn about how to use Stative Verbs and how to use some verbs as Stative and Dynamic (verbs that show action).

STATIVE VERBS

Remember that a Stative verb means that there is not an action happening. It is only a ‘state’.

Examples

  • In the context of the examples to the right, we would not be able to use the Present Continuous because the verbs represent a state, not an action.

List of Stative verbs

There are 4 general categories of Stative Verbs but remember that some of these verbs can be used in both Stative and Dynamic form. What makes them stative is that they are explaining a state, not an action.

EMOTIONS AND
FEELINGS
PERSEPTIONS
AND SENSES
OPINION POSSESION
AND SIZE
like,
dislike
love
need
prefer
want
wish
appear
feel
hear
look
see
seem
sound
smell
taste
agree
disagree
believe
know
imagine
think
understand
be
belong
have
own
posses
measure
weigh

VERBS THAT ARE STATIVE AND DYNAMIC

So, now we know that Stative verbs only show a ‘state’, so Dynamic verbs show ‘action’. Some examples of Dynamic verbs are: run, dance, shower, play, etc. We can see the action occuring. Some verbs can be used both as a state and as an action. Here are some examples.

Examples

  • Think as a stative mental state
    • I think she is right.
    • He thinks the meeting is on Monday. I think it’s on Tuesday.
  • Think as an action in progress with Present Continuous
    • Please turn down the music. I’m thinking.
    • He’s thinking of having the meeting on Monday.
  • to be as a state of someone’s personality
    • Jim is such a nice guy
    • She’s always fair.
  • to be as a temporary action that is happening right now
    • He‘s not being very friendly at all today.
    • I don’t think she’s being very fair to you.
  • to have as a state of posession
    • We have a house in Malaga
    • She has a lot of friends.
  • to have as an activity that is taking place now or soon.
    • I’m having a party this weekend.
    • She’s having some friends over tonight to watch a movie.

OTHER VERBS THAT CAN BE BOTH STATIVE AND DYNAMIC

  • Remember that when you want to use a verb in a Stative form it is a ‘state’
    • The dinner tastes great!
  • But when it is in a dynamic state, there is action.
    • We are tasting each wine.

Cursos Inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio, tenemos cursos de inglés para todas las necesidades y niveles. Pónte en contacto con nosotros a idiomas@camaradealava.com

Grammar

Now that you have read about Stative Verbs in English, take a look at our other Grammar posts:
Grammar: Present Continous
Grammar: Second Conditional

English Grammar: Present Continuous

English Grammar: Present Continuous

English Grammar: Present Continuous. Both Spanish and English have a Present Continuous verb tense (I’m working / Estoy trabajando) and although their form is similar (verb to be + gerund), they are used differently. In English, we use the Present Continuous for: (1) things happening in the moment, (2) ongoing actions that are happening around the current time (3) annoying habits and (4) future plans.

FORM

The form of Present Continuous is the same in Spanish and English

  • Positive statements
    • Subject + verb to be + gerund
  • Negative statements
    • Subject + verb to be + not + gerund
  • Questions
    • Verb to be + subject + gerund

USES

THINGS THAT ARE HAPPENING IN THE MOMENT

  • Use present continuous to talk about something you are doing at the moment that you are saying it.
    • I’m writing this blog post right now.
    • I’m looking out the window.
  • NOTE: in Spanish you say ‘te escribo‘ in an email, but in English we say ‘I’m writing…‘ because for us it is something we are doing in that very moment. Learn more here.

ONGOING EVENTS / TEMPORARY SITUATIONS/HABITS

  • Present Continuous is also used for ongoing events or temporary situations. I may not be doing them at this very moment, but at this time in my life.
    • I’m learning to paint. (not right now, but I go to a class twice a week)
    • She’s not going to class this month. (She’ll go again next month)

ANNOYING HABITS

  • Use Present Continuous to show you are annoyed with someone’s habit.
    • You are always watching the TV!
    • He’s always complaining.

DEFINITE FUTURE PLANS

  • For definite future plans, we also use present continuous
    • After work I’m going to the gym.
    • Next month we are going to Malaga

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SPANISH AND ENGLISH

  • There are times when in English we use present continuous but in Spanish you use Present Simple.
  • In addition to the examples in the photo on the right, we have the following:
    • What time are you going? ¿A que hora vas?
    • Who are you going with? ¿Con quien vas?
    • I’m attaching the document you requested. Adjunto el documento que me hayas pedido.

English Grammar

Now that you have seen English Grammar: Present Continuous, take a look at our other English Grammar posts:
English Grammar: Second Conditional
English Grammar: Regret + gerund/infinitive

English Grammar: Second Conditional

English Grammar: Second Conditional

English Grammar: Second Conditional.

No tengas miedo de la palabra condicional. No es TAN complicado y no es tan diferente en Castellano. Vamos a repasar la forma (la estructura de la frase Second Conditional), el uso (cómo usarla) y algunos ejemplos.

Don’t be afraid of the word conditional. It’s not THAT complicated and it’s not that different than Spanish. Let’s go through the form (the structure of the a Second Conditional sentence), the use (how to use it) and some examples.

FORM

Second Conditional form
  • Como puedes ver en la foto, utilizamos la cláusula If/Unless con el pasado simple/continuo seguido de una cláusula que utiliza would/could/might + infinitivo.
  • También podemos cambiar el orden de las cláusulas.
    • If I had more time off, I would read more.
    • I would read more if I had more time.
  • En castellano, dónde usamos subjuntivo, en inglés usamos pasado simple/continuo
    • Si tuviera más días libres, leería más.

USE

  • Cuando utilizamos el segundo condicional, estamos hablando de una situación altamente improbable que está ocurriendo ahora o en el futuro.
  • Es importante entender que, aunque utilicemos el tiempo pasado, nos estamos refiriendo a hechos que suceden en el presente o en el futuro.
  • Se entiende de la misma manera en castellano
    • Si tuviera más tiempo (presente, no probable), leería más (presente/futuro).
Second Conditional use

Examples

Second Conditional example 1
  • Ejemplo #1:
    • Si tuviera 10 millones de dólares, compraría casas en distintos países.
  • Meaning:
    • No tengo 10 millones de dólares (presente), así que no compraré casas en distintos países (futuro)
  • Ejemplo 2:
    • No viviría en Nueva York a menos que tuviera un trabajo bien pagado.
  • Meaning:
    • Hay muy pocas probabilidades de que consiga un trabajo bien pagado (presente), así que no me mudaré a Nueva York (futuro).
Second Conditional example 2
Second Conditional example 3
  • Ejemplo #3:
    • Si mi jefe planificara un poco más las reuniones, no serían una pérdida de tiempo (waste of time).
  • Meaning:
    • Es probable que mi jefe no planifique las reuniones (presente), por lo que las reuniones seguirán siendo una pérdida de tiempo (futuro).

Conditionals

Si quieres ver más sobre English Conditional 1 y 2, haz click aquí para ver nuestro vídeo.

Cursos inglés

Si te gustó nuestra explicación de English Grammar: Second Conditional, también ofrecemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades.

  • Business English en grupo y InCompany (online y presencial)
  • Preparación de exámenes A2, B1, B2, C1, C2
  • Conversación
  • Inglés General
Making requests in English

Making requests in English

Making requests in English. It’s true that us Americans are very direct giving answers and advice, however, when we need to request something, we usually take the indirect, more polite route. In Spanish, you would call this ‘haciendo pelota’ (kissing ass in English) but I promise it’s just built into us since childhood.

MAKING SIMPLE REQUESTS

A simple request means you ask someone to do something they are expected to complete. The reader needs to comply with the request.

  • Can you call Carol and cancel tomorrow’s meeting please?
  • Would you mind picking Lucia up from school today?

Sometimes a simple request is more like a reminder.

  • Could you please send me that report I asked for?
  • So, can you drop by after work?

Form

You have decided to use these phrases as they are the most appropriate for the situation. Now, let’s use them properly.

CAN / COULD

Remember that ‘could’ is more polite than ‘can’. This is the only difference between the two words.

  • Can + subject + please + infinitive without to + object
    • Can we please call him?
  • Can + subject + infinitive without to + object + please
    • Can John look for the cat please?
  • Could + subject + please + infintive without to + object
    • Could you pease tell me you name?
  • Could + subject + infinitive without to + object + please
    • Could she stop singing please. I can’t concentrate.

WOULD YOU MIND

To learn more about the different uses of the phrase ‘Would you mind?, click here.

  • Would + subject + mind + gerund (+object)
    • Would you mind going? I’m very busy.
    • Would he mind finishing up early tonight?

ASKING FOR FAVORS OR MAKING BIG REQUESTS

When we ask people for favors or big requests, remember to use more polite language or they are less likely to say yes.

Asking for favors and big requests means that the reader does not need to comply with your request.

  • I was wondering if I could take the day off tomorrow.
  • Do you think Clare might be able to cover me?
  • I was hoping she could give three classes.

FORM

As was the case previously, it is important to know how to properly use these expressions.

Was/were wondering if…

Here we are using an indirect question to request something. To learn more about indirect questions, click here.

  • Subject + was/were wondering + if + request (could + infinitive without to + object)
    • I was wondering if you could help me with this project.
    • I was wondering if Joe could take my place.
    • Paul was wondering if Ann could purchase the materials.
    • We were wondering if your team could give us a hand.

Do you think …

Here there are two versions. ‘Do you think you could‘, which is less polite than ‘Do you think you might be able to‘. However, both are good options. Since you are asking someone directly, we always start with ‘Do YOU think…’. If you ask ‘Does Carol think … ‘, we are asking someone for their opinion and it is no longer a request.

  • Do you think + person + could + infintive without to (+ object)
    • Do you think you could come over?
    • Do you think that Jennifer could finish my part?
  • Do you think + person + might be able to + infinitive without to (+object)
    • Do you think I might be able to take Monday off?
    • Do you think Martin might be able to do it?

I was hoping…

Here we can make a request for ourselves or for someone else. Since this is not a direct question, it may be unclear sometimes that this is a request, but it is!

  • Subject + was hoping (+that) + person + could + infintive without to (+object)
    • I was hoping I could leave early today.
    • Emma was hoping that you could send her the homework.

Writing Rules

Now that you have seen Making requests in English, take a look at our other Writing Rules posts:
Writing Rules: C1 Advanced Writing
Writing Rules: Formal and informal emails

Cursos inglés

Si buscas un curso de preparación de exámenes, de Business English o simplemente de conversación, tenemos una oferta amplia. Haz clic aquí para ver nuestros horarios o ponte en contacto con nosotros a través de idiomas@camaradealava.com

English writing: Formal and informal

English writing: Formal and informal

English writing: Formal and informal

English writing: Formal and informal. Truth be told, we are not as formal as you think, especially Americans. Not only that, but if you are still using very formal language with me after we have known each other for some time, I may feel offended. Formal language can be seen as cold and distant. So, I’m not saying forget everything your teachers have taught you, if you need to write a cover letter, a formal complaint or a first email to a new client, formal language is the way to go. But, once you have a relationship, lighten up.

REASON FOR WRITING

  • Formal: In relation to our previous email…
    • In relation to our previous email, we are willing to reduce the shipping charges.
  • Informal: Just to follow up on our chat…
    • Just to follow up on chat, we are happy to reduce the shipping charge.
  • Formal: I’m writing to inform you…
    • I’m writing to inform you that you have been accepted into the University of Chicago.
  • Informal: Just to let you know…
    • Just to let you know – I got in! I’m going to UofC!
  • Formal: We are delighted to inform you that.
    • We are delighted to inform you that your request has been accepted.
  • Informal: Guess what…
    • Guess what! We just got your package today.

ATTACHMENTS

  • Formal: Please find attached
    • Please find attached the documents you requested.
  • Informal: I’m attaching / I’ve attached
    • I’m attaching the documents to asked for.
    • I’ve attached the documents here.

REQUESTS

  • Formal: Please take into account…
    • Please take into account that the meeting starts at 10 am.
  • Informal: Don’t forget to…
    • Don’t forget to join the meeting at 10.

CLOSING AN EMAIL

  • Formal: I look forward to seeing you on Monday.
  • Informal: See you on Monday. Hope to see you on Monday.

English Writing

Now that you have seen English writing: Formal and informal, have a look at our other Writing Rules posts:
Writing Rules: Gerunds that follow to
Writing Rules: Giving advice

English: Regret + gerund or infinitive

English: Regret + gerund or infinitive

English: Regret + gerund or infinitive

English: Regret + gerund or infinitive. Again we are reviewing a word whose meaning changes depending on the use of the gerund or infinitve following it. Since regret is a word were we are already sorry about something, we don’t want to use it incorrectly.

REGRET + GERUND

  • Use regret + gerund to express that you are sorry about something you have said or done.
    • He really regrets not calling you. (He wishes he had called)
    • My daughter regrets telling her best friend her secret. (She wishes she didn’t tell her)

REGRET + INFINITIVE

  • Use regret + infinitive (without to) before giving someone bad news.
    • I regret to tell you that your sister didn’t make it out of surgery. (I’m sorry, but…)
    • We regret to inform you that your payment has not been accepted. (We have bad news…)

Practice

Now that you have read through the explanations, try answering the following sentences with the correct form of the verb. Check your answers at the bottom of the post

  1. We really reget ____ (tell) her that she was sick. I think she would have been better off not knowing.
  2. They regret ____ (lie) about the case because now they can be sued, not because they feel sorry.
  3. I regret ____ (inform) you that your payment is overdue.
  4. The letter stated, ‘We regret ____ (tell) you that you have not been accepted.’
  5. I don’t regret ____ (tell) her the truth. She deserved to know.
  6. Why do you regret ____ (move) here?
  7. On behalf of the airline, I regret ____ (inform) you that this flight is overbooked.
  8. She told me that she regrets ____ (be) my friend.
  9. I don’t regret ____ (inform) them about what happened on the trip.
  10. Do you regret ____ (go) on vacation?

Grammar

Now that you have seen English: Regret + gerund or infinitive, have a look at our other Grammar based posts:
Grammar: remember + gerund or infinitive
Grammar: transitive and intransitive verbs in less than 5 minutes

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Alava, tenemos cursos de inglés para todas las necesidades y niveles. Ponte en contacto con nosotros para recibir más información.

Answers

  1. telling
  2. lying
  3. to inform
  4. to tell
  5. telling
  6. moving
  7. to inform
  8. being
  9. informing
  10. going
Giving advice in English

Giving advice in English

Giving advice in English

Giving advice in English. There are only a few occasions when you should be using ‘have to’ with someone.

  1. You are a parent and you are telling your children what to do (and this concept is debatable)
    • You have to clean your room before you leave this house.
  2. You are telling your friend in an exaggerated way what they need to do because it was fun, exciting, entertaining, etc.
    • You HAVE TO see the last season of Stranger Things!
  3. You are seriously concerned about someone.
    • We have to go to the emergency room now!

If you are not in one of these three situations, then stop telling people in English what they ‘have to do’. This is a strong statement for us and is usually used for children. So, when speaking or writing to adults, employees, etc, I soften my advice by using some of the following phrases. Why? Because they are adults and can make the best decisions for themselves. And yes! This included employees.

I RECOMMEND / SUGGEST…

  • A polite way of giving advice to someone
  • 1 Form: Person + recommend/suggest + gerund
    • They recommend printing the file instead of sending it by email.
    • She suggests charging them before sending anything out.
  • 2 Form: Person + recommend/suggest + noun
    • My doctor doesn’t recommend those pills for pain.
    • Lucia suggests the white one because it is lighter.

I WOULD RECOMMEND / SUGGEST…

  • A more polite way to give advice.
  • 1. Form: Person + would recommend/suggest + gerund
    • I would suggest calling the store first to see if it’s still open before you take a ride over there.
    • I wouldn’t recommend eating there. It hasn’t got very good reviews.
  • 2. Form: Person + would recommend/suggest + noun
    • I wouldn’t recommend the beef to anyone. It was not their best dish.
    • I think a doctor would suggest time off for that type of injury.
  • Use the adverbs highly or stongly to give strength to your statement.
    • I would highly recommend checking with your doctor before trying that medication.
    • She would strongly recommend Paul’s garage for any problems you may have with your car.

IF I WERE YOU…

  • A way of giving advice based on what you would do if you were in their situation.
  • Form: If I were you + I + would + infintive (without to)
    • If I were you, I would finish send the email out before the end of the day.
    • If I were you, I would talk to my boss before jumpling to any conclusions.

HAVE YOU TRIED…

  • An inoffensive way of asking what someone has already done.
  • Form: Have you tried + gerund
    • Have you tried turning it on and off again?
    • Have you tried calling their main line and asking to speak to him directly?

Writing rules

Now that you have seen Giving advice in English, take a look at out other Writing Rules posts.
Writing Rules: I’m writing
Writing Rules: Gerunds that follow to

Cursos inglés

¡Ven a la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Alava para apuntarse a un curso de inglés hoy mismo!

Remember + gerund or infinitive

Remember + gerund or infinitive

Remember + gerund or infinitive

Remember + gerund or infinitive. Remember can be followed by either a geruna or an infinitive, but the meaning changes. It’s important to know the difference

REMEMBER + GERUND

  • Use a gerund after remember to talk about memories or to recall someone or something
    • He remembers wearing a suit but that really all he remembers from that day. (He can recall the memory of wearing the suit).
    • I don’t remember talking to her, but I could be wrong. (Maybe I just forgot that we talked)

REMEMBER + INFINITIVE

  • Use remember + infinitve to express that you have not forgotten to do something
    • I didn’t remember to pay the fee, so we lost the membership. (I forgot to pay the fee).
  • Many times we use remember + infinitive to give a stong suggestion to someone who should not forget to do something.
    • Remember to take an umbrella. It’s going to rain later. (don’t forget your umbrella)

PRACTICE

Fill in the blank with the appropriate form of the verb in parentasis. Then check your answers at the bottom of the post

  1. Did you remember _______ John back about the meeting tomorrow? (call)
  2. I don’t remember ever _______ this city before? (visit)
  3. Doesn’t she remember _______ together as kids when they were younger? (play)
  4. I’m really sorry but I didn’t remember _______ the box from the office. (pick up)
  5. Why doesn’t she ever remember _______ her homework on time? (finish)
  6. Julie doesn’t remember _______ him at the fair. (meet)
  7. Remember _______ your driver’s license this year! (renew)
  8. I remember _______ to the store, but I don’t remember _______ the apples (go, buy)
  9. George, did you remember _______ the paper for the office? (order)
  10. I will always remember _______ it in the future after getting in so much trouble. (buy)

GRAMMAR POSTS

Now that you have seen Remember + gerund or infinitive, take a look at our other grammar posts:
Grammar: Would you mind?
Grammar: Multi Word Verbs

Answers

  1. to call
  2. visiting
  3. playing
  4. to pick up
  5. to finish
  6. meeting
  7. to renew
  8. going, buying
  9. to order
  10. to buy
English emails: I'm writing

English Emails: I’m writing

English emails: I’m writing. When writing emails in Spanish, it’s quite common to use Present Simple: I write… However, in English we use Present Continuous to write about something that is happening in the moment. I’m writing this blog post right now, so I use Present Continuous.

EMAILS

Starting emails

Since I am writing an email in the moment, we use Present Continuous. To start the email, say:

  • I’m writing you in reference to the conference that is taking place next month.
  • I’m writing you in response to your questions about the fair.

Attachments

We can also use the present continuous to talk about an attachment to an email:

  • I’m attaching the documents you requested earlier today.
  • As requested, I’m attaching a copy of the budget.

Talking about yourself

Remember, we use Present Continuous to talk about things we are doing in the moment, so if you are talking about something happening now in your life, use present continuous:

  • I’m working a lot right now since I just started a new job.
  • I’m living in a nice apartment about 15 minutes from the center.

Writing Rules

Now that you have learned about English Emails: I’m writing, take a look at our other Writing Rules posts:
Writing rules: Gerunds that follow to
Writing rules: B2 Writing tips: RED

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava, tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades. Para inscribirte en un curso o para recibir más información, rellena la hoja aquí.

English: gerunds that follow to

English: Gerunds that follow to

English: gerunds that follow to

English: gerunds that follow to. Gerunds and Infinitives are always difficult to remember (click here for more on gerunds vs infintives). They are also a large part of the B2 and C1 exams for Cambridge, Oxford, EILTS, EOI and so on. And let’s not forget that we use gerunds and infinitives all the time in geral conversation. So, yes, they are important. But, let’s not forget that sometimes gerunds follow ‘to’ (when functioning as a preposition). Here are just a few of the most common examples.

TO BE LOOKING FORWARD TO

  • Mostly used at the end of an email but is also in spoken English
    • Looking forward to meeting you (Notice that we do not use the subject here. This is less formal)
    • We are looking forward to working with you. (This is more formal because we use the subject ‘we’)

BE USED TO / GET USED TO

English: gerunds that follow to
  • Be used to (estar acostumbrada a). To show that you doing something regularly. It also means that you enjoy it.
    • She’s used to waking up early because he does it every day
  • Get used to (acostubrandose). To show you are trying to make something a habit and enjoy it
    • I’m getting used to living in a small town, but it is still difficult sometimes.
  • Click here for more about these two phrases

COMMITTED TO / DEDICATED TO

  • Committed to and dedicated to both mean that you are willing to give your time and energy to something
    • We have politicians that are very dedicated to cleaning up the city.
    • I am fully committed to doing a good job on the exam.

CONFESSED TO / GET AROUND TO

  • Confessed to means that you have admitted that you have done something wrong.
    • Joe confessed to taking the computer home with him.
  • Get around to doing something means that you have done soemthing you have been wanting to do for a long time.
    • I never got around to learning French.

Writing rules

Now that you have seen English: gerunds that follow to, take a look at our other Writing Rules posts:
Writing Rules: RED
Writing Rules: Mr., Miss, Mrs, Ms

Cursos de inglés en Vitoria

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava tenemos clases de inglés para todos tus necesidades.

  • Business English / Inglés para negocios
    • InCompany
    • Online
    • Face to face
  • General English / Inglés general
  • Exam Prep / preparación de exámenes de Cambrdige, EILTS, EOI, Oxford Test of English

Transitive and Intransitive Verbs

Transitive and Intransitive Verbs in less than 5 minutes

Learn about Transitive and Intransitive Verbs in less than 5 minutes.

TRANSITIVE VERBS / VERBOS TRANSITIVOS

  • Verbos que deben ir seguidos de un objeto directo.
  • Si el verbo transitivo no va seguido de un objeto, sonará extraño.
  • Ejemplo:
I love… (Who or what do you love?) Amo… (A quien o que amas?)
I love tennis Me encanta el tenis.
I love books Me encantan los libros
I love you Te quiero a ti.
  • Ejemplo 2:
She’s wearing… (What is he wearing?)Ella lleva puesto… (¿Qué lleva puesto?)
She’s wearing a suit to work Ella lleva un traje al trabajo
Jenny’s wearing a t-shirt today Jenny lleva hoy una camiseta
He’s wearing pijamas. Lleva un pijama

INTRANSITIVE VERBS / VERBOS INTRANSITIVOS

  • Verbos que no necesitan ir seguidos de un objeto directo.
  • Ejemplo
We arrived Llegamos
He lied Él mintió
I criedYo lloré
The sun rose at 5:24 (at 5:24 answers when, so it is not a D.O.)El sol se levanta a las 5:24 (a las 5:25 responde a cuando, por lo que no es un objeto directo.
Mary is sleeping on the couch (on the couch answers where, so it is not a D.O)Mary está durmiendo en el sofá (en el sofá responde a donde, por lo que no es un objeto directo.

DIRECT OBJECT / OBJETO DIRECTO

  • Sustantivo o pronombre que recibe la acción.
  • Suele escribirse como D.O.
  • El D.O. responde a la pregunta QUIÉN o QUÉ recibió la acción del verbo

Verbos que son transitivo e intransitivo

A veces un verbo puede ser tanto TRANSITIVO como INTRANSITIVO, dependiendo de su uso.

TRANSITIVE / TRANSITIVOINTRANSITIVE /INTRANSITIVO
Lucia plays basketball every Monday and Wednesday / Lucía juega al baloncesto todos los lunes y miércolesLucia plays outside. / Lucía juega fuera.
We will continue the meeting after lunch. / Continuaremos la reunión después del almuerzo.After lunch the meeting continued. / Tras el almuerzo, la reunión continuó.

More examples / Mas ejemplos

  • OTHER TRANSITIVE VERBS
    • address
    • borrow
    • bring
    • discuss
    • give
    • lend
  • OTHER INTRANSITIVE VERBS
    • Die
    • Live
    • Rain
    • Smile
    • Stand
    • Wait

Grammar Videos

Now that you have seen this grammar video, take a look at our other posts:
Grammar Video: Frequency adverbs in less than 5 minutes
Grammar Video: Embedded questions in less than 5 minutes

Cursos Ingles

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Álava tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades. Ponte en contacto con nosotros para saber más idiomas@camaradealava.com

Would you mind?

Would you mind?

Would you mind? Although this seems like a very simple phrase, it can get quite confusing. M1nd in this question means ‘to bother’ or ‘molestar‘ in Spanish. The tricky part is in the answer. No, it doesn’t bother me or yes, it does bother me.

ASKING FOR PERMISSION

This is an indirect way of asking for permission for something. It is quite commonly used in English. Pay special attention to the answers.

DO YOU MIND?

Informal question

Do/Does (someone) mind + if + subject + present simple

  • Informal way to ask if something bothers you or makes you uncomfortable.
    • Do you mind if I call you Joe? (Does it bother you if I call you Joe?
    • No, I don’t. (You can call me Joe)
    • Yes, I do. (I don’t want you to call me Joe.
Do you mind if he comes? ¿Te importa que venga?informal
No, I don’t No, no me importa
Yes, I do Si me importa.

WOULD (someone) MIND?

Would (someone) mind + if + subject + present simple

  • Polite way to ask permission from someone, by asking if it bothers them.
    • Would he mind if I use his phone? (Can I use his phone?)
    • No, he wouldn’t. (You can use it)
    • Yes, he would. (I don’t want you to use it.)
Would you mind?
Would she mind if we met after class? ¿Le importaría si quedamos después de clase?Polite
No, she wouldn’t. No, no le importaría.
Yes, she would. Si, si le importaría.

Would (someone) mind if + past simple

Polite and Formal question

Would someone m1nd + if + subject + past simple

  • Would she m1nd if we didn’t go together (Would it bother her if we went separately?)
  • No, she wouldn’t. (we can go separately)
  • Yes, she would. (I would rather go together)
Would he mind if we arrived late? ¿Le importaría que llegáramos tarde?Polite and Formal
No, he wouldn’t No, no le importaría.
Yes, he would. Si le importaría.

Would (someone) mind + me/my + ing… ?

  • Would they mind me leaving early? (Will it bother them if I leave perfore expected?)
  • No, they wouldn’t (It is OK if you leave early)
  • Yes, they would. (I will not be happy if you leave early)
Polite and formal

REQUESTING HELP

We can also use this question form to politely request help from someone.

WOULD (someone) M1ND + ING

Polite

Would (someone) mind + ing…?

  • Would Carol mind picking up my daughter from school? (Can Carol and/or does Carol want to get my daughter from school?)
  • No, she wouldn’t (I can get her)
  • Yes, she would. (I can’t or do not want to get her)

ANSWERING NO OR YES

As you have seen in the previous examples, you can answer these types of questions with ‘Yes, I do/would’ or ‘No, I don’t/wouldn’t’. However, it quite common to use some of the following phrases as well.

NO

  • Of course not
  • Not a problem
  • No, I can do it.
  • Sorry, but I can’t
  • I would, but I …
  • It’s not that I m1nd, I just can’t.

English Grammar

Take a look at our other Grammar posts:
Grammar: Multi- Word Verbs
Grammar: Reflexive Pronouns

Cursos de inglés

En la Cámara de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio, tenemos clases para todos los niveles y necesidades. Ponte en contacto con nosotras a idiomas@camaradealava.com o ver nuestros cursos pinchando aquí

Writing Rules: Mr Miss Mrs Ms

Writing Rules: Mr, Miss, Mrs, Ms

Writing Rules: Mr Miss Mrs Ms

Writing Rules: Mr, Miss, Mrs, Ms. You may have heard of Mr., Miss and Mrs., but have you heard of Ms.?

History of Ms.

The idea of Ms was originally presented by publishers as early as the 1900s who wanted to avoid embarrassment by mistaking a woman’s status. It wasn’t until the 1960’s, however, that Sheila Michaels supported the idea of using Ms as a way for women to not have to be identified by their marital status. Read more about Sheila Michaels. Ms. was later used as the title of a famous feminist magazine in the US in 1971. Take a look at the online Ms Magazine here. However, Ms was not used in the New York Times until the 1980s. Today, the term is used quite frequently.

MR.

  • Used to formally present or address a man.
  • You can use Mr. with or without the man’s last name.
    • I would like to present Mr. Smith.
    • I met Mr. O’Donnell yesterday.
  • Used to formally address someone in a letter or email, especially if you do not know the person’s name.
    • Dear Mr. Potter,
    • Dear Mr. Harry Potter,

MISS

  • Miss has previously been used to refer to someone of a younger age.
  • Today we use Miss to refer to an unmarried woman, young or old.
  • As with Mr, use Miss with or without the first name.
    • Miss Philips will address the crowd at the concert this weekend.
    • Dear Miss Anita Jones,

MRS.

  • Previously, Mrs. related to an older woman.
  • Today we use Mrs. to refer to a married woman.
  • As if the case with Mr and Miss, use Mrs. with or without the first name.
    • Mrs. Patel is presenting the awards tonight.
    • Dear Mrs. Lucy Johnson,

MS.

  • Use Ms. To address a woman when you do not know her marital status.
  • Women who may not want you to know their marital status may also use Ms.
  • It is quite common today for someone to use Ms.
    • Hello Ms. Hintz. I would like you to meet my partner Mr. Williams.
    • Dear Ms. Rita Brown,

PRONUNICATION

It is quite important to know the difference between Miss, Mrs. and Ms.

  • Pronounce the ‘s’ in Miss like the ‘s’ in snake
  • Mrs is pronounced as if it was written misses,
    • the first S sounds like snake, but the second sounds more like a z in buzz
  • Pronounce the ‘s’ in Ms with a ‘z’ sound only.

Writing Rules

Now that you have seen Writing Rules: Mr Miss Mrs Ms, take a look at our other writing focused posts:
Emails: we can do better
Frequency adverbs in less than 5 minutes

English Grammar: multi-word verbs

English Grammar: Multi-word verbs

English Grammar: Multi-word verbs. English learners hate PHRASAL VERBS but English speakers love them! So, there is no avoiding them. This post takes a look at how to use multi-word verbs, which include four types.

Multi-word verbs

Multi-word verbs are verbs that are followed by particles and/or prepositions. Although they are commonly all referred to as phrasal verbs, it is important to know the difference so as to know how to use them.

TRANSITIVE PHRASAL VERBS

  • Transitive Phrasal Verbs are the only type of multi-word verbs that can be separated as seen on the left.
  • Throw away
    • Throw is the verb
    • away is the particle
  • They need to be followed by an object.
    • I pick up my son at 4 o’clock.
    • I picked my son up at 4 o-clock.

NOTE

  • When the object of the transitive phrasal verb is a pronoun, the particle MUST come after the object.
    • I picked him up already.
    • I looked it up on the internet.
  • The verb and particle are not usually separated when the object of the transitive verb is a long noun phrase.
    • She needs to pick up his favorite chocolate cake from the store.
    • I have to look up some important dates for history class.
  • We do not usually separate the verb and participle when the transitive phrasal verb is part of a relative clause.
    • We can wrap the present with the paper I picked up today.
    • The money I paid back was for the school trip.
  • When the verb is modified by an adverb, it can come either at the end of the clause or before the verb
    • He paid his mortgage off immediately.
    • He immediately paid off his mortgage.

INTRANSITIVE PHRASAL VERBS

  • Intransitive Phrasal Verbs consist of a verb and a particle
  • Broke down
    • broke is the verb
    • down is the particle
  • They CANNOT be separated.
    • The plane will take off on time.
    • They are always eating out.

NOTE

Some phrasal verbs have more than one meaning. Some may be transitive and others intransitive

  • TAKE OFF is intransitive when it means to leave.
    • The plane will take off on time.
    • What time are you planning on taking off?
  • TAKE OFF is transitive when it means to remove.
    • You can take your jacket off once we are on the plane.
    • Don’t take the sticker off.
  • PASS OUT is intransitive when it means to lose consciousness
    • Julie passed out at lunch this afternoon.
    • It is kind of scary when someone passes out.
  • PASS OUT is transitive when it means to give something to someone
    • The teacher always passes the exams out as soon as we get there.
    • Can you help me pass these pamphlets out after work today?

PREPOSITIONAL VERBS

  • Prepositional Verbs are always followed by a preposition
  • go over
    • go is the verb
    • over is the preposition
  • They are transitive so they need to be followed by an object
  • Unlike transitive verbs, You CANNOT separate them.
    • Someone broke into the bank!
    • How are you dealing with this loss?

NOTE

  • Some examples of prepositions are:
    • into
    • with
    • on
    • over
    • of
    • after
  • When a prepositional verb is modified by an adverb, it must go (1) at the end of the sentence or (2) before the preposition. It cannot go after the preposition.
    • 1. He’s coping with the loss of his mother really well.
    • 2. He’s coping really well with the loss of his mother.
    • He’s coping with really well the loss of his mother.

PHRASAL-PREPOSITIONAL VERBS

  • Phrasal-Prepositional Verbs are followed by a particle and then a preposition.
  • Came up with
    • came is the verb
    • up is the particle
    • with is the preposition
  • The particle and the preposition must always stay together

NOTE

Other examples of Prepositional-Phrasal Verbs:

  • do away with
    • Emma did away with all the old toys she used to play with.
  • get away with
    • She’s always getting away with everything because she’s the youngest.
  • look down on
    • I think it is ridiculous to look down on someone for having an accent.

English Grammar

Now that you have learned all about English Grammar: Multi-word verbs, take a look at more of our Grammar related posts:
Grammar: Reflexive Pronouns
Grammar video: Adverbs of frequency in less than 5 minutes

English Grammar: Reflexive Pronouns

English Grammar: Reflexive Pronouns

English Grammar: Reflexive Pronouns

English Grammar: Reflexive pronouns can be tricky. Here we will try to explain simply how and when to use them.

What are the Reflexive Pronouns?

1st person 2nd person 3rd person
singular myself yourself herself/himself/itself
plural ourselves yourselves themselves

When do we use Reflexive Pronouns?

  • Use reflexive pronouns when the subject and the object is the same.
Reflexive pronoun example1
Reflexive pronoun example2

When NOT to use Reflexive Pronouns

  • When the subject and the object is not the same
It’s not our fault. (the subject is IT, the object is FAULT They blame themselves. (the subject is THEY, the object is THEMSELVES)
It’s our fault (the subject is IT, the object is FAULT)He should blame himself. (The subject is HE, the object is HIMSELF
  • Normally we do NOT use Reflexive Pronouns after verbs: wash/shower/shave/dress
After practice she always showers. NOT: After practice she always shower’s herself
Hurry up and get dressed!NOT: Hurry up and get dressed yourself.
  • We do NOT use Reflexive Pronouns after verbs such as feel/relax/concentrate/meet
Try to concentrate on what you are doing. NOT: Try to concentrate yourself on what you are doing.
What time should we meet?NOT: What time should we meet ourselves?

NOTE!

  • Do not mix up each other or one another with Reflexive Pronouns. They have different meanings.
Reflexive Pronouns example 3
Reflexive Pronouns Example 4

Other use for Reflexive Pronouns

  • We can also use Reflexive Pronouns in order to emphasize who did something.
    • He made the chair himself! (I am surprised that he was able to do that)
    • This is the first time we made dinner ourselves! (I am emphasizing that no one else helped us.)

PRACTICE EXERCISES

  1. He presented _________ to the everyone at the party.
  2. They bought _________ everything they needed for school.
  3. He looked at _________ in the mirror.
  4. She got dressed __________ for work.
  5. We took care of _________ when we were younger.
  6. The cat finds water __________ outside.
  7. He shaves _________ every morning before going to work.
  8. I am always calling _________ because I can’t find my phone anywhere.
  9. All of you should really help __________ to the food.
  10. You should concentrate __________ on the exam.

__________________________________________________________________________________

Answers: 1. himself, 2. themselves, 3. himself, 4. —-, 5. ourselves, 6. itself, 7. —-, 8. myself, 9. yourselves, 10. —-

English Grammar Practice

Now that you have learned English Grammar: Reflexive Pronouns, have a look at our other posts that focus on Grammar and Exam Preparation:
CAE exam Speaking Part 3: Disagree
Vocab Rehab: Used to, be used to, get used to

used to, be used to, get used to explained

Used to, Be used to, Get used to

used to, be used to, get used to explained

Most people confuse used to, be used to, get used to. So, we try to make it as clear as possible for you below. If you want to see more about how to use these three expressions, check out our Grammar Video here.

how to use Used to + infinitive

Used to + infinitive

We use used to + infinitive to talk about past events. Usually it’s to indicate something you did or something that happened in the past that no longer happens.

  • They used to live in Chicago. (they no longer live there)
  • She used to play basketball. (she does not play basketball now)

how to use be used to + gerund/noun

Be used to + gerund/noun

Use this tense to talk about something you are accustomed to doing. Be used to can be followed by a gerund or a noun.

  • He’s used to sleeping on a hard bed.
  • I’m used to working long hours.
  • We are not used to loud noises.
  • Are you used to living in small spaces?

How to use get used to + gerund/noun

Get used to + gerund/noun

We use this tense to talk about something you are becoming accustomed to doing. This can also be followed by a gerund or a noun.

  • He moved here from a small town so he’s just getting used to living in a big city.
  • Are they getting used to eating at 2Pm?
  • I don’t think I will never get used to the time change.

Vocab Rehab Posts

Now that you have learned about how to use used to, take a look at our other vocabulary-based posts.
Vocab Rehab: collocations with annual
Vocab Rehab: grateful