English Vocabulary: Attrition

English Vocabulary: Attrition

English Vocabulary: Attrition. Yes, there is a word for everything. There are also words with several meaning. Attrition is both of these.

ATTRITION

  • Primarily used in the UK to refer to a reduction in the workforce due to not replacing employees who leave.
    • Staff attrition is only going to bring longer working days for those of us who are left.
    • By means of attrition, the workforce will be reduced.

RATES OF ATTRITION / ATTRITION RATES

  • Used in the US to refer to people who leave an educational course before they complete it.
    • There are higher attrition rates among teenagers in the US than in Europe.
    • If the rate of attrition continues to increase, they will cancel the course.

WAR OF ATTRITION

  • Gradually weakening something and destroying it, usually an enemy.
    • The continuous attacks are an ongoing war of attrition.

Vocab Rehab

Now that you have seen English Vocabulary: Attrition, have a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: loss, loser, lost lose
Vocab Rehab: oversight

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades para mayores de 16 años. Ponte en contacto con nosotros para encontrar una clase apropriada para ti.

Word Formations: loss, loser, lost, lose

Word Formations: loss, loser, lost, lose

Word formations: loss, loser, lost, lose. Why are word formations so important for Language learning? Well, from just one word, you can learn to create 5 more! Think about how your vocabulary base grows just by learning how to build word formations.

LOSS (noun)

Word Formations: loss
  • to have less than you previously had of something
    • Weight loss is a multi-billion dollar business.
  • a disadvantage due to have someone leave or due to something being taken
    • If you want to leave that’s fine. It’s your loss.
  • a death
    • the family is grieving from a recent loss.

LOSER (noun)

  • a person or a team that does not win
    • The loser has to buy the first round of drinks.
  • someone that never succeeds.
  • this is a very negative word to use and not appropriate in most cases.
    • I don’t know why she always dates losers.
loser

LOST (adjective)

lost
  • to now know where you are.
    • Hi, I’m calling to say that I will be a bit late to the interview. I am lost.
  • when no one knows where something is.
    • If you don’t try to talk to them, your money will be forever lost.
  • when you don’t know what to do.
    • If you have advice, I would be happy to here it. I feel pretty lost about what I should be doing.

LOSE (verb)

  • Present simple: lose
  • Past simple: lost
  • Past participle: lost
  • to become unable to find something.
    • Do you know where you lost your earrings? We can go back and look.
  • to have something taken away from you, including people by means of death
    • 50 people lost their jobs last month.
    • We lost our brother to Cancer 5 years ago.
  • to have less of something than you had before
    • She has lost the desire to go to trial.
  • The opposite of win
    • I can’t believe Madrid lost!
lose

LOST (verb) vs LOST (adjective)

lost vs lost

This can get a bit complicated. Note that the past tense of ‘lose’ is ‘lost’ and ‘lost can also be an adjective.

  • Verbs describe the action
    • I lost ·$5.00.
  • Adjectives describe a noun or pronoun.
    • I found the lost money.

Vocab Rehab

Now that you have seen Word Formations: loss, loser, lost, lose, take a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: oversight
Vocab Rehab: discrepancy

Cursos de inglés

Tenemos cursos de inglés para mayores de 16 años, para todos los niveles y necesidades en la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Álava.

English Vocabulary: Oversight

English Vocabulary: oversight

English Vocabulary: Oversight. This is a funny word as it almost feels like it has two opposite meanings. On one hand, it means to pay special attention to something and yet it can also mean to make a mistake because you haven’t paid enough attention.

OVERSIGHT (MISTAKE)

  • A mistake due to a failure to see something or pay attention to something
  • Usually referred to as a small mistake. Be careful what you are calling an oversight.
    • I’m sorry. It was an oversight on our part. We will send you the new model today.
    • I would say it was more than just a simple oversight. I needed the model last week.

OVERSIGHT (CONTROL)

NOUN

  • Management of a project
  • Assure that a project is going as it should
    • You will need to speak to my boss about that. I just provide general oversight on the project.
    • If there is no governmental oversight, companies will never reduce their greenhouse gasses.

ADJECTIVE

  • oversight can also be used to decribe the type of committe, board, etc.
    • She sits on the oversight committe for sustainability.

COLLOCATIONS WITH OVERSIGHT

Adjectives with oversight

  • minor, major, lax, strict, effective, ineffective, slight
    • It was due to a minor oversight, but they have corrected the mistake.
  • administrative, technical, federal, financial, logistical, governmental, operational, regulatory,
    • Not having enough chairs for everyone was a logistical oversight on their behalf.

Verbs with oversight

  • to be an oversight
    • I appologise. This was clearly due to an oversight.
  • has oversight of
    • He has oversight of the financial department
  • to avoid, prevent, eliminate
    • I will review the numbers to avoid an oversight.

Prepositions and prepositional phrases

  • due to
  • exempt from
  • subject to
    • Although they are a large and powerful company, they are not exempt from oversight.
  • by/in (accounts, Congress, human resources, sales, the sales department, the state, the police)
    • It was left out due to an oversight by/in accounts.
  • of (the agency, department, industry, operation, project)
    • They claim that there is governmental oversight of the operation.

English Vocabulary

Now that you have seen English Vocabulary: Oversight, take a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: discrepancy
Vocab Rehab: false friends: career and degree

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Alava, tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades.

English Vocabulary: Discrepancy

English Vocabulary: Discrepancy

English Vocabulary: Discrepancy. Saying there seem to be some discrepancies is a friendlier, more diplomatic way to tell someone they have made a mistake or that you don’t agree with them.

DISCREPANCY

  • use discrepancy when there are two things that should be the same but are not.
  • This word refers to numbers, figures, data, etc.
    • There is a discrepancy in the figures. You say that the company spent $35,000 on travel, but we only have $28,000 accounted for.
    • We need to review the stock again because you and Jack have some dicrepancies in your paperwork.
  • We can also use it to talk about a difference in ideas
    • We are waiting on a decision from the Board of Directors. There seem to be serious discrepancies between some of the members about how to continue.
    • His policies show apparent discrepancies between what he promised and what he is able to offer.

COLLOCATIONS WITH DISCREPANCY

PREPOSITIONS

  • between
  • in

VERBS

  • account for
  • arise
  • be
  • explain
  • exist
  • find
  • note
  • notice
  • notice
  • observe
  • occur
  • perceive

ADJECTIVES

  • apparent
  • great
  • huge
  • large
  • major
  • marked
  • minor
  • obvious
  • serious
  • slight
  • small
  • some
  • substantial
  • understandable

Vocab Rehab

Now that you have seen English Vocabulary: Discrepancy, take a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: False Friends: career vs degree
Vocab Rehab: tenacious

Cursos ingles

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades. Cursos presenciales de inglés en Vitoria u online desde tu casa y/o oficina.

False Friends: career and degree

False Friends: Career and Degree

False Friends: career and degree. Oh how much do we hate those False Friends – the words that sound exactly like a word in a different language but has a different meaning. It sounds like it’s a friend, but it’s not. Curse you False Friends!!!

CAREER – PROFESIÓN / TRAYECTORIA

  • Career in English is a job that you have been doing for a long time (not your university studies)
    • Before her career in social work, she was a banker.
    • He’s finally retiring after a 40 year career in marketing.

DEGREE – CARRERA

  • a qualification given for finishing a university course
  • degree is the correct translation of ‘careera‘ in Spanish.
    • He has a degree in education.
    • Although he got his degree in History, he’s working in politics.

FALSE FRIENDS

Not that you had a look at False Friends: career and degree, have a look at our other False Friends posts:
1. Vocab Rehab: False Friends: Terrific and terrifying
2. Vocab Rehab: False Friends: Suburbs and slums
3. Vocab Rehab: False Friends: Sensitive and Sensible
4. Vocab Rehab: False Friends: Comprehensive and Understanding

Cursos Inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava, tenemos cursos de inglés para todas las necesidades y niveles.

  • Preparación de exámenes de Cambrdige, EOI, Oxford A2 a C2
  • Business English desde A1 a C2
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  • Cursos de Conversación
English Vocabulary: tenacious

English Vocabulary: tenacious

English Vocabulary: tenacious. There are lots of names for these kinds of people: persistent, tough, annoying. But, when we use the word tenacious, there is a strength behind it. We are talking about someone who won’t stop usually because they believe strongly in something.

TENACIOUS

  • Adjective
  • Someone who doesn’t stop until they achieve what they want.
    • Amnesty International is a tenacious advocate for human rights.
    • She’s a tenacious little girl and doesn’t accept no for an answer.
  • Something that is strong or not persistent.
    • We need to find a more tenacious metal for this project.
    • Julie really has a tenacious memory

TENACITY

  • noun
  • the quality of being very determned.
    • I admire your tenacity for change.
    • He showed a lot of tenacity, but in the end I’m not sure he is going to win.
  • The quality of persisting
    • The company has outlived the other ones out of sheer tenacity.
    • The tenacity of certain stories allow then to be told by each generation.

TANACIOUSLY

  • adverb
  • To achieve something in a tenacious way.
    • Joe is tenaciously battling the lawsuit in court.
    • We tenaciously record every event so that future generations will know what happened.

Cursos de inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades, presencialmente y online.

English Vocabulary

Now that you have read about English Vocabulary: tenacious, take a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: time off
Vocab Rehab: strive

English Vocabulary: Time off

English Vocabulary: Time off

English Vocabulary: Time off. Time off is a way to refer to all types of ‘leaves’ from work without giving too many details. It can refer to medical leave, maternity/paternity leave or simply vacation/holidays.

TIME OFF

  • A period of time that you do not have to go to work due to illness, holiday, permission, etc.
    • She’s going to take some time off after the baby is born.
    • They are taking some time off to get some help for their ageing parents.
    • I was wondering if I could take some time off at the end of the month.

COLLOCATIONS WITH TIME OFF

  • Time off to do something
    • Tom would like to get some time off to relax.
    • More and more fathers are taking time off to care for their children.
  • Time off for something
    • It’s hard to get time off for vacation in the U.S.
    • I wouldn’t want to use my time off for sick days.
  • Time off from something
    • Mary is requesting some time off from her job.
    • An increasing number of people are receiving time off from work due to stress.
  • VERBS USED WITH TIME OFF
    • take
    • have
    • get
    • give
    • be given
    • receive
    • request

English Vocabulary

Now that you have seen English Vocabulary: Time off, take a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: Strive
Vocab Rehab: Bargain

English Vocabulary: strive

English Vocabulary: Strive

English Vocabulary: strive. Strive can be a complicated word to use because it doesn’t actually collocate with a wide variety of words. And although some people may translate it as ‘tratar’ or ‘esforzarse’ in Spanish, it doesn’t actually capture the full meaning of the word. In situations like these, it’s good to see examples and the words that it does collocate with in order to apply the word correctly.

STRIVE

  • to try very hard to achieve or accomplish something
  • strive + infinitve
    • She strives to do her best in everything she does.
    • We are always striving to learn new things to apply at our jobs.
  • strive + for + noun
    • If he continues to strive for perfection, he will wear himself out.
    • Their slogan is ‘Strive for excellence’.

COLLOCATIONS WITH STRIVE

Strive + to + infinitive + something

  • strive to____ something
    • achieve
    • be
    • become
    • (not) die
    • do
    • (not) fail
    • improve
    • (not) lose
    • offer
    • provide
    • succeed at

Strive + for + something

  • strive for ____
    • excellence
    • greatness
    • perfection
    • success

adverb + strive

  • ____ strive
    • always
    • constantly
    • continuously

Vocab Rehab

Now that you’ve seen our post about English Vocabulary: strive, check out our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: bargain
Vocab Rehab: inclusive language

Cursos inglés

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English Vocabulary: Bargain

English Vocabulary: Bargain

English Vocabulary: Bargain. You are familiar with the word negotiate, but bargain can also be used to discuss prices in an office or out on the street.

BARGAIN

  • verb
  • to try to convince someone to offer a service or do something for you at a cheaper price.
    • Don’t be afraid to bargain for the price of the clothes.
    • I really don’t feel comfortable bargaining for the price when it is already very cheap.
  • noun
  • something that is sold for less than it’s real value.
    • I got the sofa for a real bargain.
    • We should go shopping this weekend. There are lots of bargains for Christmas.

STRIKE A BARGAIN

  • make a deal
  • come to an agreement about what each party will be doing.
    • The union finally struck a bargain with Michelin and the workers will go back to work next week.
    • It is in their favor to strike a bargain before this gets messy.

Vocab Rehab

Now that you have seen English Vocabulary: Bargain, take a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: inclusive language
Vocab Rehab: spot on

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Alava, tenemos cursos de inglés para todas las necesidades y niveles: A1, A2, B1, B2, C1, C2

English Vocabulary: foresight

English Vocabulary: foresight

English Vocabulary: foresight. someone who has foresight is not a magician or a fortune teller. It is simply someone who can read a situation, judge what the possible outcomes may be and learns to plan in a way for this situation. Some people may have foresight at work but not with relationships, or vice versa. Other people may be able to see what is going to happen but don’t know how to plan for that situation. Someone with foresight can do both.

HAVE THE FORESIGHT (noun)

  • to have ability to understand a situation and it’s possible outcomes and
  • be able to plan for this situation
    • He had the foresight to leave his job before they went bankrupt.
    • If Carol had the foresight to sell the house before the market crash, she should have had the foresight to save some money as well.

FORESEE (verb)

  • to be able to judge a situation and make plans to deal with it.
    • He didn’t forsee the divorce at all, so he was shocked when his wife told him.
    • They forsaw the war and made plans to leave the country as soon as they could.

(UN)FORESEEABLE (adjective)

  • foreseeable: an event or situation that can be predicted
    • She will be working in the school for the forseeable future.
  • unforseeable: an event or situation that can not be predicted.
    • I lost my job last month, so for the unforseeable future, I will be unemployed.

Vocab Rehab

Now that you have seen English Vocabulary: foresight, have a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: sign up
Vocab Rehab: steal vs rob

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava, tenemos cursos de inglés para todos las necesidades y niveles. Mira nuestras cursos aquí.

English Vocabulary: Sign up

English Vocabulary: sign up

English Vocabulary: sign up. This phrasal verb is a very important one to know. This month you need to SIGN UP for English class, dance class, art class or any other activity that you are hoping to be a part of. My kids always make the mistake of saying to me, ‘Did you inscribirme in the class?’ And I respond, ‘No, I signed you up.’ It’s such a basic phrase, but even they never seem to use it.

SIGN UP

  • Phrasal verb. Learn more about how to use phrasal verbs here.
  • to join or agree to be a part of an activity or event.
    • I signed my daughter up for dance class.
    • Julie signed up for the marathon.

Vocab Rehab

Now that you have learned about English Vocabulary: sign up, take a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: steal vs rob
Vocab Rehab: to be promoted

Cursos inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Alava, tenemos cursos de inglés para todos los niveles y necesidades. Puedes mirar nuestros cursos y horarios aquí o pónte en contacto con nosotros a idiomas@camaradealava.com

  • Inglés General A2, B1, B2, C1, C2
  • Inglés para negocios (Business English) A2, B1, B2, C1, C2
  • Preparación de exámenes de Cambridge, Oxford Test of English y EOI
English Vocabulary: steal vs rob

English Vocabulary: steal vs rob

English Vocabulary: steal vs rob. These words have a lot in common, but there is a clear difference.

STEAL

  • irregular verb: steal, stole, stolen
  • take objects from someone or something without their permission.
    • He stole the wallet from my purse.
    • My computer was stolen yesterday at school.

ROB

  • regular verb: rob, robbed, robbed
  • robbery happens to people or places.
    • He robbed me in the bar.
    • They robbed the bank before getting away.

English Vocabulary

Now that you learned about English Vocabulary: steal vs rob, take a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: to be promoted
Vocab Rehab: hear vs listen

Cursos inglés en Vitoria

Si quieres certificar tu nivel de inglés, mejorar tus posibilidades de trabajar o simplemente mantener tu nivel, tenemos curos para todos las necesidades y niveles en la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio. Pincha aquí para saber más. Ponte en contacto con nosotros a idiomas@camaradealava.com.

  • Cursos de preparación para los exámenes de Cambridge B2, C1, C2 y Oxford Test of English A2, B1, B2
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    • presencial y online
    • InComany – cursos deseñados para ti y tu empresa
  • Inglés de mantenimiento B2, C1 y C2
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English Vocabulary: to be promoted

English Vocabulary: to be promoted

English Vocabulary: to be promoted. Today we celebrate the fact that our local football club, Alaves has been promoted to First Division! ¡Aupa Alaves! Click here to read more about Vitoria-Gasteiz’s Alaves team, but before you do that, let’s take a look at the different meanings of promote. Also, check out the collocations used with promote.

TO BE PROMOTED

  • to raise someone to a more important position
  • Usually someone is promoted to something
    • John has just been promoted to the head of his department, so we are having a party for him.
    • If the team wins the next game, then they will be promoted to 2nd Division.

TO PROMOTE

  • to encourage people to like and/or buy a product
    • Kristen is promoting a new line of cosmetics, so you should buy from her.
    • If you really want to promote your product well, you should talk to an advertising company.
  • To encourage people to like and support an idea.
    • The world leaders really need to promote the idea of taking care of the planet or else there will never be real change.
    • They promote peace talks between the two countries.

COLLOCATIONS WITH PROMOTE

  • adverbs that collocate with promote
    • actively, positively, widely
      • We are actively promoting English classes, so sign up today.
    • aggressively, heavily,
      • I’m not sure I agree with such aggressive promoting, but I see that it is effective.
    • effectively, successfully
      • The company is successfully promoting the product nationally and plans to go international.
  • nouns that collocate with promote
    • access, diversity, equality, human rights, awareness
      • I do all I can to promote diversity and inclusion at work and at home.
    • efficiency, innovation, education,
      • If the government really wants to promote innovation, they need to provide more grant money to start up businesses.
    • business, growth, development
      • The new mayor says she want to promote growth, so she is presenting a new bill.
    • competition, debate, dialogue, trade
      • If we don’t promote dialogue and debate, then we will never grow as a country.

English Vocabulary

Now that you saw ‘English Vocabulary: to be promoted‘, take a look at our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: hear vs listen
Vocab Rehab: raise, rise, arise

Cursos de inglés

En la Escuela de Idiomas de la Cámara de Comercio de Álava, tenemos cursos para todos los niveles y necesidades. Contáctanos a idiomas@camaradealava.com. Tenemos cursos online y presencial para mayores de 16 años.

English Vocabulary: hear vs Listen

English Vocabulary: hear vs listen

English Vocabulary: hear vs listen. These two verbs get mixed up all the time. So, let’s look at how they are different and how they are similar.

HEAR

  • Irregular, Transitive and Intransitive verb
  • Think of ‘hear’ as an event.
    • I heard what the Prime Minister said yesterday. The focus is on the event of the Prime Minister, not that I heard it.
  • You receive a sound / you are conscious of a sound
    • Did you hear that? I think someone is at the door.
  • You understand a piece of information
    • He heard they are getting a divorce.

LISTEN

  • Regular, transitive verb
  • Usually followed by ‘to’
  • Think of listen to as an action.
  • He never listens to me when I’m speaking. It’s so annoying. (The focus is on the action of listening.)
  • To give your attention to someone or something.
    • I listened to the whole album and I love it.

HEAR OR LISTEN

Sometimes we can use both hear or listen in a sentence. However, the meaning changes a bit.

  • Remember, we use ‘hear’ to focus on the activity and ‘listen’ to focus on the action.
    • I love hearing the rain hitting the window. (the focus is on the rain hitting the window)
    • I love listening to the rain hitting the window. (the focus is on listening)

English Vocabulary

Now that you have read about English Vocabulary: hear vs listen, take a look at our other vocabulary based posts:
Vocab Rehab: Raise, Rise, Arise
Vocab Rehab: Backlash

Cursos de inglés

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English Vocabulary: Raise Rise Arose

English Vocabulary: Raise, Rise, Arise

English Vocabulary: Raise, Rise, Arise. These three verbs can be very confusing. So, let’s break them down one by one.

Raise

English Vocabulary: Raise
  • Raise is a regular verb, which means that raised is the past and past participle.
  • It is a transitive verb which means that an object must follow the verb. This is the main difference between raise and rise. To learn more about transitive verbs click here.
  • We need to raise something.
    • He raised his hand. (hand is the object)
    • The government raised taxes (taxes is the object)

Rise

  • Rise is a irregular verb. Rose is the past tense and risen the past participle.
  • It is intransitive, so it is not followed by an object. Click here to learn more.
  • The temperature is rising. (no object needed)
  • She rose. (no object needed)
English Vocabulary: Rise

Arise

English Vocabulary: Arise
  • Arise, like rise, is an irregular verb. Arose is the past tense and arisen is the past participle .
  • It is also intransitive, so it is not followed by an object.
  • Arise means that something presents itself.
    • Should the need arise, … (should the need present itself…)

Collocations

It’s important to learn vocabulary in context. So, here are some of the words that tend to ‘collocate’ with Raise, Rise and Arise.

Raise

  • a question, a point,
  • I would like to raise a question here.
  • your hand, her leg, their heads
    • Please raise your hand if you know the answer.
  • standards
    • If you want to past the audit, your company must raise its standards.

Rise

  • dramatically, markedly, sharply, significantly, steeply, substantially
    • Profits rose substantially in the third quarter.
  • a little, slightly, higher, steadily, fast, quickly, rapidly
    • Sales dropped rapidly during the pandemic.
  • be expected to, be likely/unlikely to, be projected to, be set to, begin to, continue to
    • The number of people is unlikely to rise this late in the year.
  • above, by, from, in, in line with, to

Arise

  • naturally, spontaneously, directly
    • Sometime bad behaviour at school arises spontaneously.
  • may, might, be linkely to, be unlikely to
    • Disagreements are likely to arise out of a debate.
  • from, out of

English Vocabulary

Now that you have seen, English Vocabulary: Raise, Rise, Arise, have a look at our other posts:
Vocab Rehab: backlash
Vocab Rehab: strike

English Vocabulary: Backlash

English Vocabulary: Backlash

English Vocabulary: Backlash. Some say that all social issues face backlash at a certain moment. What kinds of rights are facing backlash by you?

BACKLASH

  • A reaction that goes against a previously popular idea or person.
  • A reverse movement.
  • a negative reaction to something
    • There has been a backlash against women’s rights in the US.
    • Governments who make very liberal or very conservative laws often face a lot of backlash from opposing sides and from their own side if they think their ideas are too extreme.

COLLOCATIONS WITH BACKLASH

Collocations are words that go together. Stop learning vocabulary by itself and learn it with the words that are used with it. Learning this way will also help you memorize the words more easily.

VERBS

  • Experience, face
    • The government is facing a backlash from Feminist Movements on both sides.
    • She is experiencing a backlash for not having consulted her partners.
  • Cause, create, prompt, provoke, spark
    • The gas company provoked a backlash for increasing their prices.
    • It was quite predictable that his message was going to spark a backlash from his voters.
  • Anticipate, expect, fear, predict
    • They should have anticipated the backlash and had a strategy to deal with it.
    • Even though she feared a backlash, she went ahead with the new regulation.

ADJECTIVES

  • Consumer
    • They promted a consumer backlash by not giving employees paid holidays.
  • Political
    • The Right is experiencing political backlash for having attacked their party’s famous icon.
  • Public
    • There will be strong public backlash to the increased retirement age.
  • Violent, racist, serious
    • Many States are facing a violent backlash from anti-immigrant supporters.
    • After COVID, many member of the Asian community incorrectly received racist backlash.

ENGLISH VOCABULARY

Now that you have seen English Vocabulary: Backlash, check out our other Vocab Rehab posts:
Vocab Rehab: strike
Vocab Rehab: sibling